VÍGVELLIR – make and show your own maps

Hugh Higgins

Squire
WBNW
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Leifr Eiríksson said:
Hugh Higgins said:
It kinda looks like a place near where I live. Along the River Trent. :razz:
Hey! I live there too.
Needs a discarded shopping trolley though.
Mhm, you're right about that - though I don't think anyone would be willing to mod one in. :3
 

Éadric

Knight at Arms
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And another doodle. Nothing special, but I think this game needs more landscapes with deciduous trees. I wanted to give at least the suggestion of being close to woodland. I fear more trees would kill performance. Anyway, the paths are slightly sunken.

Perhaps I could give it the generic name Dúnland, which is Old English for 'hilly country'. (From Old English dún comes Modern English down, both the noun and the adverb and preposition.)







 

gloatsneer

Regular
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These maps look great! They look natural and good to play in. I love the feeling of space in the last one! Sunken roads are a good idea as well.
 

RagnarGerman

Sergeant Knight
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I edited a map and would like so see some report. :smile:


Added village







http://image-upload.de/image/7y8NmP/4154ec9542.jpg


Added longboat


Corpse
 

Dansk viking

Master Knight
NWWBVC
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Looks pretty neat, don't know how it would play out though. Feel free to send me the files and I might add it to the rotation if it's suitable.
 

Lily-Livered River Pirate

Sergeant Knight at Arms
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Éadríc said:
Anyway, the paths are slightly sunken.
...Slightly sunken you say, why yes. WHY YES!

Bjorn is in Australia, why not let loose the slopes? GODDAMN YOU ALL slope lovers. You just wait til I return and convince every team I'm ever on to draw the fight to the flat. This being said I will add with restraint that it looks great.

Ragnar, Vikingr has had a long tradition of rain without cloud. Might you be the one to put an end to it?

Also: remember people! What matters most in a map is points of convergence: is the place teams are most likely to meet most interesting to fight at?
 

RagnarGerman

Sergeant Knight
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I didn't do anything on the weather,to be honest.  It was allready like this, as I said, it's a allready excisting map that I just edited. "Pine Forest small" is the map name.
 

Wernicke

Sergeant at Arms
NWWBWF&S
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Éadríc said:
Perhaps I could give it the generic name Dúnland, which is Old English for 'hilly country'. (From Old English dún comes Modern English down, both the noun and the adverb and preposition.)
So that's where Tolkien got the name. Doesn't Dun or Dún also mean something in Brythonnic?
 

hrotha

Grandmaster Knight
WBNWWF&SVC
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In the Middle-earthian name it is not dún but dun, with a short vowel, meaning "dun, brownish". The word itself might be a Brythonic loanword into Old English, but that is disputed, and it is perhaps more likely that both Germanic and Celtic inherited it from Proto-Indo-European.
 

Éadric

Knight at Arms
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Yes, I love that word! If it was borrowed from Celtic it must have happened in the Old Germanic era already. But it was probably inherited directly from Proto-Indo-European.

Old English dun(n) seems to originally have meant something like 'bright brown, bright dark', like the fur of healthy beasts. It is presumably the first element in Old English names like Dunstán 'bright dark stone' and Dunhere/Dunnere 'bright dark warrior'. The latter name has a direct cognate in archaic Dutch Donner/Donder, still found in the last name Donners/Donders '(son) of Donner/Donder', not to be confused with donder 'thunder'. Another, archaic Saxon Dutch (first) name with this element is Dunnink 'bright dark one', not to be confused with Dutch dun 'thin'.

But by itself the word was also attested on the mainland as Old Saxon dun, as a gloss for Latin spadix 'chestnut brown' (of horses).
 

Celtichugs

Sergeant Knight at Arms
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Wernicke said:
Éadríc said:
Perhaps I could give it the generic name Dúnland, which is Old English for 'hilly country'. (From Old English dún comes Modern English down, both the noun and the adverb and preposition.)
So that's where Tolkien got the name. Doesn't Dun or Dún also mean something in Brythonnic?
No. It's Gaelic and it references a fort.
 

Wernicke

Sergeant at Arms
NWWBWF&S
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Celtichugs said:
Wernicke said:
Éadríc said:
Perhaps I could give it the generic name Dúnland, which is Old English for 'hilly country'. (From Old English dún comes Modern English down, both the noun and the adverb and preposition.)
So that's where Tolkien got the name. Doesn't Dun or Dún also mean something in Brythonnic?
No. It's Gaelic and it references a fort.
wow ok
 

RagnarGerman

Sergeant Knight
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Some work on the Jomsborg map. (Edited Faernabo) This is my second map.

Ship building.

Longboats,bringing some loot at home.

Inside of it. (Not edited)

New Faernabo longhouse

Another longhouse with horse decoration on the roof

Inside of it.

Small house,outside,weapons on the wall.

Gate 1 + wall.

Gate 2 + wall.

Meadhall house. (No Inn included)

Simple house.

Some items,shields,helmets,etc at the Faernabo longhouse.

Runestone.


Replies are welcome. :smile: