The Dictionary - what do the words mean?

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Deathbytac0

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So, is this Old English, after reading this I started to wonder. I have been all over google translate looking in Lantin before I found this, I thought I saw somewhere something about Latin lol. So I guess my real question is this Old English or something and does it ave other languages in it, I want to learn more I think its kinda cool  :razz:.

edit: While surfing the internet I stumbled upon Anglo-Saxon/Old English dictionaries, alphabets, origin, etc. I will try to make what I can of it and hopefully at least speak what people know of it as fluent as my Spanish.
 

Adorno

Bedroom Assassin
Duke
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The languages used here are both native Briton/Brythonic, Irish (Gaelic), Celtic and Anglo-Saxon (Germanic); and many Latin terms have survived.
The modern day English is a conglomerate of many influences, especially the Anglo-Saxon.

What is referred to as Old English is actually Anglo-Saxon.
And if you go way back then the Germanic languages, as well as Celtic is based on Indo-European languages.
 

Dante Borgia

Sergeant
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Just found out that the Dictionary me and Iskar put together was implemented in the game.

Can't stress how happy and proud I am for helping make the game even more historically accurate. Thanks guys.  :grin:
 

Ambaryerno

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Some random thoughts:

I found it odd that gesiþas are being treated as separate units from duguðas and geoguðes. I've done a great deal of discussion with J. K. Siddorn (author of Viking Weapons and Warfare, and the head of the Regia Anglorum experimental archaeology/living history organization) on the early Saxon period. Both duguðas and geoguðes are a part of a lord's retinue, and are themselves gesiþas. Further food for thought is that it makes the PLAYER a King's gesiþ if you join one of the Anglo-Saxon or Jutish factions. Also, a gesiþ could have his own gesiþas, which makes ALL of a player's party members in an Anglo-Saxon context gesiþas....

Really, the point is it's sort of redundant having gesiþ as a separate unit type.

I want to know about the Ridwiga thing. If Ridwiga were heavy cavalry then Bean du Ric would make sense. As it is they are pretty useless due to a lack of armour. Otherwise why not make all my men geoguth so as to get to the Hearthweru upgrade?
As far as riders go:

A lot of newer research and archaeology is showing that the entire Anglo-Saxon fyrd was a mounted force, and fought both as mounted infantry and as cavalry (think the Rohirrim, which is pretty appropriate considering Tolkien's source for them....)

Arguably, you could easily have the Anglo-Saxon troop tree more like the old Nords from M&B Beta: Linear troop development with awesome infantry that's also strong in a secondary role (cavalry for the Anglo-Saxons, whereas the Nord Huscarls in Beta were WICKED archers).
 

Jan Arie

Sergeant at Arms
NWWBVC
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For those that don't understand a thing of the dictionairy, I found another one, this one is quite simplified. http://home.comcast.net/~modean52/oeme_dictionaries.htm
 

Quinlan

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Ambaryerno said:
A lot of newer research and archaeology is showing that the entire Anglo-Saxon fyrd was a mounted force, and fought both as mounted infantry and as cavalry (think the Rohirrim, which is pretty appropriate considering Tolkien's source for them....)
This is quite intresting. I remember having read something like this elsewhere as well.

But implementing this into the game would make the Anglo-Saxon factions somewhat OP, I'd wager. I played a Briton some versions ago with an all-cavalry warband - mainly marchogs or whatever they are, teulus were very expensive even back  then - and I could wipe out an army three to four times larger than my own with minimal casualties. Not even with any kind of tactics, just steamrolling as the AI would do.

Then again, according to the same source (I read it a while back and can't find it anymore), during this timeframe a Welsh warband would have been mainly mounted as well. But that still leaves the Picts and the Irish.
 

Ambaryerno

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Myself, I'm all for realism, so it'd be great to see. Besides, complex troop trees can get to be unwieldy. Also right now the Anglo-Saxons and Jutes have no less than I think THREE types of heavy infantry (though as I understand it, the Ridwigas should be cavalry). I mean seriously, what's the difference between a Duguth and Beadu Ric, other than the former being able to level up to Hearthwearu?
 

Ambaryerno

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Quick note on Anglo-Saxon naming:

The mod currently appears to use -ing as shorthand for "Son Of." However from my reading on the language, this is not actually how the -ing ending was used. Anglo-Saxons actually had -sunnu (if I have the case right) and -dohtor, however these were VERY rarely used outside of those areas which fell under Danish influence in the later Saxon period. For the most part, individuals with the same name were differentiated by their home/place of origin (Penda is almost universally known as Penda of Mercia) or occupation, (as is the origin of modern surnames Cooper, Fletcher, Smith, etc.) and, somewhat less frequently, with a superlative/descriptive nickname (Æðelread Unræd).

The -ing ending was used instead to denote family/clan affiliation, much the same as Mac and O' for Scots and Irish today. The family name was taken from either the founder or another prominent member of that family. Using Penda as an example, the clan name was derived from his ancestor Icel, so he would most properly be known as Penda Iceling. His sons would ALSO use the "Iceling" name. Additionally only VERY prominent families were named in this way (I have seen the Icelingas of Mercia, Wuffingas of East Anglia, and the Stuffingas, among others, however no such names seem to exist for the ruling families of the Gewisse and Northumbrians). Additionally, Wódening was a popular surname among kings since many traced their ancestry directly to Wóden.

Finally, the royal titles of Cyning and Æþeling were used as SURNAMES. Penda of Mercia would be referred to as Penda Cyning, not Cyning Penda. The same applies to Æþeling (so, Wulhere Æþeling, rather than Æþeling Wulfhere). So Penda would instead be named: Penda Cyning Iceling instead of Cyning Penda Pybbing or whatever he's named currently in the game.
 

Skorne

Recruit
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THANKS FOR THIS THREAD!!!

I was searching the internet for information on Titles (Lord, Duke, etc) for the translations of Toisearch, etc... but found nothing.  Then came here hoping someone asked about it.  This totally rocks... GREAT ONE!!!
 

ronamjack

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I haven't seen any Devon placenames apart from Exeter in the dictionary.  Which moderns settlements are:

Tref Ilic
Banhedos

?
 

ronamjack

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At the risk of destroying the whole idea of the name 'brytenwalda', in the book I'm reading at the moment (The Anglo Saxons by Geoffrey Hindley) the author equates 'bretwalda' (the only written refefence) to a broader Germanic idea of 'Brytenwealda' which the author translates as 'broad ruler',

"an ancient Germanic term for the latin imperator (emperor)"

So maybe the idea of a 'bretwalda' had nothing to do with Britain at all?

:eek:
 

jorias

Recruit
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just wanted to add my two cent's, and say this is pretty cool, well done I always knew that those weird words meant something lol
 
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"Abercrdf = Abergavenny (?)"

'Abercraf' is a modern (post industrial) village in the same area.

Abergavenny I have only seen referenced in historical texts as either Abergavenny or Gobannium (Gobannio & Bannio). The latter appears to be a roman era name derived from the local language.

Given aber means "mouth of" it would be odd for abergavenny to be called 'Abercrdf' given it is sited at the mouth of the Gavenny (Welsh: Gafenni).

I dont know where "Abercrdf" would come from to be honest. "Crdf" would be a very odd name for a river.