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Two weapon fightin? (dual wielding)

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MadocComadrin

Water-Borne Annelid
Count
M&BWBWF&S
Rynuusuke said:
1. Take a look at how the metal lamination is done then how it cools. If you even have the background run the calculations for the metal cooling rates. The cooling rates will effect grain development and thus the hardness. There are more ways than just adding carbon to increase the hardness.
I know; one of they ways they effected cooling time was covering the blade in various amounts of slurry before quenching it to allow different parts to cool quicker. The hamon is created this way as a side effect. Also, I'm a math minor, I can run calculations from the transcendent to the differential!

All in all, you really just dodged the point. You had the lamination order wrong. Don't try to cover yourself by going into detail about the properties of carbon steel.

2. The drill bit was a good approximation for a garage-junkie to understand the difference between a high-strength and brittle steel against a more ductile one. Well, I guessed I learned trying to explain or help you is a waste of time and effort. One last thing, try reading this, might help you grasp some of the concept of steels and their properties.

Aye, but that wasn't the point I was making. I don't need an approximation for a garage junkie, I was looking for an experiment based solely on the scientific method to test the properties of flexure, shearing, compressive, and tensile strength of steels with various amounts of carbon content. If you can't grasp that, your degree isn't worth the paper it's printed on.
 

Coy

Knight
tumblr_llt2mc9gem1qa89zoo1_400.jpg
 

Amagic

Baron
Rapier and sword-breaker is the only efficient dual wielding style I know, rest sounds rather impractical. You'll only be using only one hand at a time for attacking, why not use the other for defense and just get a shield... Actually, I bet someone with a sword and a shield could beat someone using two swords.
 

Amman d Stazia

Master Knight
9mm Browning in my right hand to keep the security chaps at bay, Big Red Button in (well, under) my left hand, ready to launch a lot of big rockets with nasty stuff in the pointy end.

THAT is dual wielding.
 

MadocComadrin

Water-Borne Annelid
Count
M&BWBWF&S
FrisianDude said:
Rynuusuke said:
PS. I am not going to waste any more of my valuable time...Dealing with you is very far below my paygrade.

From this part I can't but conclude that you are thirteen and a ****.
Besides, if we're talking about paygrades, Software and Hardware engineers have a higher median salary than material engineers, according to the US BLS.
 
Can we just get back on the original topic at hand? If you wanna argue just go to a different thread plox. Btw Madoc I like your avatar, nice rocket-propelled-parakeet-cleaver :O
 
Hahaha nice way to get back on topic :razz:

but yeah this has been discussed to death! we have gone round and round and everytime some one new joins we just write the same stuff! spoons and sporks are the new thing deal with it.

how about two shields?
 

Swadius 2.0

Grandmaster Knight
Tying things that absorb impact directly onto your wrists is a good way to break or dislocate one of the many bones in it. You'd probably be better off tying it further up your arm between the wrist and your elbow. If it breaks, at least it has a much higher chance of it being a clean one.
 

Rynuusuke

Recruit
M&BWBWF&S
MadocComadrin said:
Rynuusuke said:
1. Take a look at how the metal lamination is done then how it cools. If you even have the background run the calculations for the metal cooling rates. The cooling rates will effect grain development and thus the hardness. There are more ways than just adding carbon to increase the hardness.
I know; one of they ways they effected cooling time was covering the blade in various amounts of slurry before quenching it to allow different parts to cool quicker. The hamon is created this way as a side effect. Also, I'm a math minor, I can run calculations from the transcendent to the differential!

All in all, you really just dodged the point. You had the lamination order wrong. Don't try to cover yourself by going into detail about the properties of carbon steel.

2. The drill bit was a good approximation for a garage-junkie to understand the difference between a high-strength and brittle steel against a more ductile one. Well, I guessed I learned trying to explain or help you is a waste of time and effort. One last thing, try reading this, might help you grasp some of the concept of steels and their properties.

Aye, but that wasn't the point I was making. I don't need an approximation for a garage junkie, I was looking for an experiment based solely on the scientific method to test the properties of flexure, shearing, compressive, and tensile strength of steels with various amounts of carbon content. If you can't grasp that, your degree isn't worth the paper it's printed on.

1. Then borrow or rent (be prepared to spend a few thousand dollars at least) a tensile-testing press and run some samples of cast iron, low carbon steel, medium-grade carbon steel and high carbon steel. Also, you can do compression testing with the same press if it is any good. For flexture and shearing you are going to have to spend a few more hundred-thousand dollars on getting presses for those tests. Or you could read that nice report I linked for you. Goes over the concepts for you quite nicely. If I were you, I would do some reading of engineering journals and references. It would cost you less.

Btw, not impressive on the math. In case you forgot or don't know engineering majors have to go through all the calcs and DiffQ. The only major that takes more math than us is an actual Math Major.

2. I wasn't dodging the point. Depending on the color coding and how it was defined, your interpretation is incorrect. If going by hardness of the steel then yes it is correct. And hardness is not entirely determined by carbon content. It is partially but not solely. Heat treatments have a larger effect on the hardness with our without any slurry (clay) smeared on. The clay not only changes that portion it also effects all the layers of steel underneath as well. Which will also cool at a slower than 'normal' rate and thus be ranked as softer (if going by a hardness scale) relative to the other portions.
 

xenoargh

Grandmaster Knight
You've got to love this thread; it's one of those black holes of the Internet  :lol:

Oh, and btw, any modder who wants to can code duel-wielding now; I provided everything but detection sorting and sample animations awhile ago.

So if people want to mod that, there is no longer any massive technical limitation, basically.
 
OMFG can you just shut up with your retarded argument or at least take it to an appropriate thread? Both of you, either be the bigger man and just walk away with your opinion or feel free to continue this but on another thread. This thread is already like 3/4 off-topic bull****.
 
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