So you want to bear an authentic Norman name

FrisianDude

Archduke
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'Croih' looks slightly off as well, though 'Croix' (as in, French for cross) does sound like croih. Drako too is a faux-Greek name, seems to me. :razz:
 

hrotha

Grandmaster Knight
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"Drako" at least could conceivably be the nickname of a Frankish tough guy trying to be cool, although it is a loanword ultimately of Greek origin. As for that "War Lord" movie, yeeeah seems like Hollywood didn't do the research :grin:
 

Éadric

Knight at Arms
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Hróða,

What about Norman (proto-)surnames based on ancestors or places? There is for example a modern French surname Anquetil. Was this a direct naming after a Norse ancestor called Ásketill, or rather a designation of hailing form a town called Anquetilville?

Also, I've learned that the surname Disney is Norman-French, which is properly D'Isigney, that is 'of Isigney', a small place near Bayeux. :grin:
 
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Man. This thread bums me out... It reminds me that my own surname is Anglo-Norman in origin. And also that a certain film involving a gay-boy-wizard bastardised my own precious surname.

Grainger.
 

hrotha

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Éadríc said:
Hróða,

What about Norman (proto-)surnames based on ancestors or places? There is for example a modern French surname Anquetil. Was this a direct naming after a Norse ancestor called Ásketill, or rather a designation of hailing form a town called Anquetilville?
Probably the former. While surnames based on manors, towns and the like were common (especially among the nobles, who even ditched older, ancestor-based surnames), I don't think the -ville ending would have been dropped from the surname, and since surnames based on ancestors were probably just as common, it's more likely that Anquetil descends directly from a dude, not from his country house; but the latter is still possible.

Of course, virtually everything can end up being a surname: nicknames (Le Brun, "the brown"; Gernon, "mustache", etc), occupations... After all, not long before the setting of Víkingr, "surnames" were exactly that - nicknames (in French, surnom still means "nickname"). The transition towards hereditary family names wasn't complete yet.
Also, I've learned that the surname Disney is Norman-French, which is properly D'Isigney, that is 'of Isigney', a small place near Bayeux. :grin:
So that's why I don't really like Disney anymore!
 

hrotha

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I updated the OP with some minor corrections to the names Anselme (<Anselm), Willelme (<Willelm) and Ive (used to have "Yve" listed as an alternative form) and to the section about the Old French subject case.
 

hrotha

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Thanks, Úlfr!

I edited the info on the definite article in the OP, introducing the typically Norman article lu.
 

Uga the Caveman

Will, lets make a deal, you don't run over me by your pony and i don't eat your pony  :grin:
 

Aklis

Squire
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Uga the Caveman said:
Will, lets make a deal, you don't run over me by your pony and i don't eat your pony  :grin:
That still means Uga can kill it and send it to me, directly to my mailbox, in very small pieces, right?
 

hrotha

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Fun fact! "Herger" could be a perfectly legit (if unattested, as far as I know) Norman name!
 

Aklis

Squire
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Pff. It's stolen from the 13th Warrior, though the appropriate version would be Hergeirr, with the same meaning as Heregar (Army Spear), so don't you come around and thinking that I'm a Frenchie.