Quests are for early game only so there should be less focus on it

There are more than enough quests


  • Total voters
    33
  • Poll closed .

Users who are viewing this thread

BoBB

Every new update seems to include more quests and I'm not sure why the dev's are wasting so much resources on this. The only reason to do quests are to gain relations and frankly, this is a painstaking way to gain grind relations. As others have already alluded, it makes the game feel like an rpg which is a bad direction to take since it's not billed as such.

As it is, there's barely enough time to do anything with all the constant warring. Does anyone do quests mid to late game? I find that I stop doing quests around the same time I stop doing tournaments, i.e. around the time I have 100+ solid troops and I'm able to start fighting nobles. To me, quests are a means of getting some easy cash in the beginning.

It's far easier to convert bandits than to recruit troops at any rate so having good relations with villagers is pretty pointless.
 

AndrewArt

Squire
I'd rather have different stages for the game, so yes, that means more quests. The problem with quests is a lack of proper structure. They should be locked behind renown/clan tiers just like workshops are. (right now you can still ask a lord to do a quest for him but he says you are too low renown. I'd like if the quest wouldn't show at all in the first place).

So with different requirements, there would have to be more quests. You can make the exclamation mark different colors, too. (Orange! = legendary quests for clan tier 5-6, purple! = difficult/epic quests for clan tiers 3-4, green! = medium quests, can do them beginning at clan tier 1-2, and blue! = beginner quests and can do them at clan tier 0, so from the very beginning). Their rewards and difficulty would of course increase based on the tier they are at, there would be different types of quests for each tier.

The game should in my opinion have more rpg features. Better polished mini-games as well. The more things to do in the game = the better, but we just need a better structure for them overall like I mentioned here, because if you just create more and more quests then the sentiment can be like yours: "don't need more of them". If they actually had a better and more clear purpose at every stage of the game, they would be a lot more enjoyable.

Tournaments should also present difficulties based on clan tier just like the quests, because they present the same problem. Why do tournaments in mid/late game? If we had at least 3 tiers of tournament difficulties, there would be a different story. Tier 1-2 = easy combatants (blue color), tier 3-4 = medium (green), and tier 5-6 = challenging (orange or red). Again, more challenging (both armor-wise and skills), more fun, better rewards. I thought of not including the possibility of entering tournaments at tier 0 because then people just jump on farming tournaments, and I think a slower/more immersive/peasant start would make more sense. Like, at least be known a little before being accepted in a tournament. Reworking the arena, or making the arena "a tournament" in itself (so basically removing it from the game), would put it at clan tier 0 and I'd be happy with that. Right now there is literally no purpose for the arena - you make no money, you train skills way too slowly, it's useless... Make it like a tournament in itself where people come and watch you like you're gladiators killing each other, and increase exp gain and also monetary gain (500 for winning, then 1000 for tier 1-2, 2000 for the tier 3-4 tournament, and 4000 for the challenging 5-6 tier, this is just an example and can be adjusted as developers wish.
 
Last edited:

Askorti

Sergeant Knight at Arms
WB
and I think a slower/more immersive/peasant start would make more sense
There is nothing immersive about grinding things.

Because after your first or second playthrough, that's what it all boils down to, grinding. The breath of freshness is already gone, and you want to be on your way to leading armies and spanking kings. Dragging out the early game only benefits new players, while everyone else has to slog through it.

Bannerlord as a game is way too barren and thin on interesting choices to be called immersive, it is a linear road to more troops, more money, bigger numbers. Making this road longer does not really benefit anyone, if it boils down to repeating the same things more times.
 

AndrewArt

Squire
There is nothing immersive about grinding things.

Because after your first or second playthrough, that's what it all boils down to, grinding. The breath of freshness is already gone, and you want to be on your way to leading armies and spanking kings. Dragging out the early game only benefits new players, while everyone else has to slog through it.

Bannerlord as a game is way too barren and thin on interesting choices to be called immersive, it is a linear road to more troops, more money, bigger numbers. Making this road longer does not really benefit anyone, if it boils down to repeating the same things more times.
I disagree, I think with a proper sense of progression the game can be much better and can remove the feeling of "linear road to more troops, more money, bigger numbers...". I personally don't take the game in that way, I like doing side-activities more than doing main things (I have no interest being part of an army, or being a vassal for another king, and I like taking things slowly and making progress in the world on my own).

I think the game needs more side-activities to do. The game is too barren right now, but can be more than this and that's what I wish to see. If there are more activities for each stage of the game (early, mid, late), then the game will be more enjoyable at every stage of the game, naturally, IF the activities are specially designed for early vs mid vs late game like I suggested. If they're just a random "have some more quests and do your own thing", lacking structure, then you will tend to generalize quests as all being useless just because most of them are really meant for the early game, not for mid or late-game, but you still encounter them just the same, no visual distinction or anything.

And you could say that the whole game is about grinding, so what's wrong in the early game needing a little bit of grinding too? Not much, I'm just saying that a sense of progression is necessary for a better game, really
 
Last edited:

Ananda_The_Destroyer

Master Knight
Well, they're not just early game anymore, because solving some issues is important for keeping your security and loyalty okay in your towns.
I actually don't do many of the quests until I have a town because going after lords, even minor faction ones is much more money for the time.
I do however always use "deliver the herd" to obtain free horses, selling the aiseri warhorses is an amazing boost to your clan funds in early game, but actually any time somebody will hand you 10k+ of warhorses it's cool :smile:

I do like having to help your towns/villages but I do also think there should be better options for having clan members do it too, since you're going to have to be fighting endless battles the way most people play. I hope they continue to add more quests for more developed Clans too and maybe special event quests for when you rule a faction and such.
 

FlowDream

Sergeant
The main Quests are unnecessary in game like m&b, because no one will play second time. Instead, tw should add more small quest that helps deepen immersion.
 
The problem with quests is that they are completely disconnected from the game and each other. It's frustrating to see that they have put so little thought in making these and continue to add new ones, like if they were a good thing. Quests are supposed to tell stories that connect you and your character to the lore, the environment and game features, currently they don't even check one of the boxes, it's just a mindless grind towards the objective, when it really should be about the journey. Devs are just wasting resources by pumping out quests, when what they really should be doing is stop, discuss what is wrong and work on getting it right.
 

redmark

Squire
The problem with quests is that they are completely disconnected from the game and each other. It's frustrating to see that they have put so little thought in making these and continue to add new ones, like if they were a good thing. Quests are supposed to tell stories that connect you and your character to the lore, the environment and game features, currently they don't even check one of the boxes, it's just a mindless grind towards the objective, when it really should be about the journey. Devs are just wasting resources by pumping out quests, when what they really should be doing is stop, discuss what is wrong and work on getting it right.
They can be grindy, but I think it's inaccurate to say they don't connect to the environment and game features. Various quests tie into the trading system, exortion by deserters reflects low security (and thus usually pops up when a fief changes hands), others link to the bandit bashing grind that inevitably exists (and make it a little easier or profitable). The rewards likewise connect to other game features, but could be ignored by a player who's happy to recruit T1s and level them chasing bandits...

Lore, maybe. But the quests reflect the reality that people in towns and villages have ordinary stuff they need to do, whoever's ruling Calradia.
 

a_ver_est

Knight
The main Quests are unnecessary in game like m&b, because no one will play second time. Instead, tw should add more small quest that helps deepen immersion.
+1

I always ignore the main quest... but I like doing small ones to increase the relationship with people of Calradia, it is a shame that the effects of good/bad relationship are somewhat limited by now.
 

Yukmouth++

Squire
Quests just need to scale properly with the economics of the game... and the economy is broken as hell. At some point receiving 1000 denar rewards is a joke.
 

Akka

Sergeant
There is nothing immersive about grinding things.

Because after your first or second playthrough, that's what it all boils down to, grinding. The breath of freshness is already gone, and you want to be on your way to leading armies and spanking kings. Dragging out the early game only benefits new players, while everyone else has to slog through it.
Speak for yourself. Having to start low to reach high, and requiring an immersive amount of efforts to get there (and not just fast-tracking from nobody to being able to speak on equal terms with a king) is actually the main draw I (and many) have in such game. Being able to quickly jump into the lord game completely cheapen the game and the world.
 

Apocal

Grandmaster Knight
Quests just need to scale properly with the economics of the game... and the economy is broken as hell. At some point receiving 1000 denar rewards is a joke.
You can make 20,000+ from "Landlord needs Manual Laborers."
 

Gortar

Sergeant
You can make 20,000+ from "Landlord needs Manual Laborers."
Yep, I never ransom bandit bosses and high tier, mounted bandit units, when i have a lot of them i look for this quest.

TIP: And i always visit the notables when i already want to sell my prisoners. Accept the quest and sell my prisoners in one go. This way the other notable have no chance to speak to me and i dont get relationship penalty with him.
 

Apocal

Grandmaster Knight
Yep, I never ransom bandit bosses and high tier, mounted bandit units, when i have a lot of them i look for this quest.

TIP: And i always visit the notables when i already want to sell my prisoners. Accept the quest and sell my prisoners in one go. This way the other notable have no chance to speak to me and i dont get relationship penalty with him.
Just in case people don't know, this tip only works if you Visit the notable. If you use the quick Talk option, it will simply dump you out of the convo once you accept the quest and allow the village headman to come whining to you.
 
They can be grindy, but I think it's inaccurate to say they don't connect to the environment and game features. Various quests tie into the trading system, exortion by deserters reflects low security (and thus usually pops up when a fief changes hands), others link to the bandit bashing grind that inevitably exists (and make it a little easier or profitable). The rewards likewise connect to other game features, but could be ignored by a player who's happy to recruit T1s and level them chasing bandits...

Lore, maybe. But the quests reflect the reality that people in towns and villages have ordinary stuff they need to do, whoever's ruling Calradia.
Yes, quests make use of some of the game features, it's fair to point that out. The important factor here is that there is no connection between what you are doing in quests and your character progression besides each quest individually contributing to other objectives not related to quests. This meaning that quests inherently don't have any purpose or value besides something to mindlessly grind over and over so you can win some money... What could be done, and should be done imo, is having quests with several steps towards a more vague objective (e.g.:multiple outcomes), something between the main quest and the ones we have in place, not too long, not too short, something that has value besides quantitative assets like money, resources or influence. Quests with qualitative value produced as you progress and not just as an ultimate objective, where you wouldn't start it because it's beneficial to become rich or conquer things but you get into them because it involves family, loved ones, friends, enemies, your home and all you care for has a human. Quests also need to connect to each other, having some sense of memory storage in a way that it correlates with past quests and world events, an example would be:

- Your family is living in a village, that village is being raided or, as a quest, you are informed that bandits are about to raid that village, then you choose to act on it, as an option you pick up your family and leave to some town, later, that town is besieged and you are confronted with ways to try to save your family, for example, you and some of your troops infiltrate the settlement, you manage to find them, but you found that your mother is very sick and cannot escape again, you must fight. Along with the garrison you, your troops and your father, who is a blacksmith, fight off the invaders. The outcome determines their survival or death, if you win and you are praised for your help and get good relations and other benefits with the town and faction, but you still have the quest to find the medicine for your mother; Your father can also die or survive the battle; If you loose, your mother ends up dying and your father gets captured or dies, you also get imprisoned (quests can be made involving escape), eventually you manage to escape but you still have the task to rescue your father (other quest), after that your father can join your party as both a companion and a personal blacksmith that repairs equipment... (if such thing is implemented)... endless possibilities
 
Quests just need to scale properly with the economics of the game... and the economy is broken as hell. At some point receiving 1000 denar rewards is a joke.
Maybe instead of dollars, give you goods related to the type of quest. That way the quest rewards keeps up with inflation. Better would not give you any material reward, but to shape up your character's rep/traits much more than currently.
 

McDadden

Recruit
Agreed. We need more quests for higher level content. That already does exist to some extent with some of the nobles, but I want more challenging quests with large rewards in influence, renown, and/or relations. Money becomes less important over time, but I can always use more non money currencies. I also think the scaling of quests is ridiculous and only exacerbates the problem with players not wanting to do quests. They should cap at a certain point so I don't have to retrieve 60 or more mules for the random notable to give me over 500 meat.
 

Antaeus

Sergeant at Arms
I find loyalty quests relatively easy to do, and a handy way of making sure I am immersed in the local politics of my fiefs. The only complaint I might have is that they tend to repeat noticeably often, so a larger pool of them might help.

But otherwise... I kind of like the fact that poachers running free on my land are going to impact on loyalty to me if I don't do anything about it. It's a very real world mecanic.

I guess they aren't quests in the traditional RPG sense, and they're more fief maintenance. So perhaps calling local issues 'quests' is misleading - relative to the long term narratives such as finding your family and declaring for the empire or not.

But both issues and quests are slowly evolving. You just have to be patient (hard for most on this forum to manage) and take a longer view.
 
Top Bottom