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Bromden

Archduke
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Ah yes, I forgot that they had their own Jesus in the person of Shirō, and how he died in the Shimabara Uprising and came back as the antichrist, just to be defeated by the adventuring trio consisting of legendary ronin Miyamoto Musashi, master ninja Yagyu Jubei and grand wizard Takuan Soho .
 

kurczak

Section Moderator
WB
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Is anime dangerous to the mind?
I don't know, I don't think I have seen a minute of actual anime footage. Just some screencaps in memes I didn't get.

I haven't watched the whole thing (why would anyone)
Low effort bait, but I'll bite. It's a nostalgia trip plus a little curiosity. I didn't know she existed until a couple of weeks ago, but, she's about my age and her cheerful disposition and the late 80s/early 90s fashion and sound remind me of a time when I and perhaps the whole world had a little more cheerful disposition too.

On a more technical side, I admire that she sings live most of the time and is very rarely off key or out of breath despite running and jumping around like a duracell bunny 99% of the show. It also amuses me that although she obviously has a lot of energy and and is not rhythm deaf and the shows being huge, mainstream production that could certainly afford a team of choreographers and dance tutros, she kind of....can't dance. It's more jumping and fast, rhythmic pacing than actual dancing.
 

Bromden

Archduke
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I wasn't baiting, I'm incapable of enjoying Jpop and don't understand the non-japanese people who do enjoy it. Also, I might have to hand in my weaboo license after saying this, but the high-pitched sounds Japanese women tend to make are bad for my nerves. It's not the case here though, her lower tone is tolerable.

The jumping while singing she does is indeed impressive. What is the opposite of impressive though is the music; it sounds like it's somewhere between MIDI tracks and gypsy wedding music. And it didn't really evolve since then, as Jpop sounds much the same today, so you can still find that same late 80s/early 90s sound and cheerful disposition there in a contemporary gig with a different squealing girl.
 

kurczak

Section Moderator
WB
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Other who are strictly pop don't really work for me. It's just her and only live. The studio versions of her songs are a little whatever, but something about her personally just does it for me.

There's some pretty good, more "adult" music about a decade before that though.

 
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I am confident that I could find at least one of the following documents before, but now I am unable to find them in National Archives. Could someone else also search for these to confirm me that they are removed(or I'm misremembering) so that I don't feel bad about being a dinosaur unable to complete the most basic digital tasks.
Despatch number 992, Embassy to SecState, “Turkish Election Day, July 21 46,” July 25, 1946, Classified General Records, Box 18, RG 84, National Archives
Despatch No 38, American Embassy Ankara to SecState, February 3, 1949. Top Secret General Records, Box 1, RG 84, National Archives.
 
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I remember the Turkish military being triggerred by this photo long ago. Some organisation organises event and takes students from 45 kindergartens to mosques, making kids to wear Islamic headwear. People found the opposition's sensibility extreme at that time, arguing that Christian versions of these events wouldn't be frowned upon in Western countries. Is that true?
 

Antonis

Marquis
WBWF&SVCNW
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Well, it depends. Here, in the great holidays, like before closing for Christmas or on some important Saint's day, the schools usually take the students to church. But when I was a student, we were not compelled to go, if we wanted, we just stayed at school, until the sermon was finished. 15 years later things are even more lax now. Speaking as a teacher, we still have to escort those who want in the chruch, but many of the students just hang out of the chruch, just to pass the time, without staying at school.
 

Orion

Still Not Worthy
Global Moderator
M&BWBWF&SNW
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I remember the Turkish military being triggerred by this photo long ago. Some organisation organises event and takes students from 45 kindergartens to mosques, making kids to wear Islamic headwear. People found the opposition's sensibility extreme at that time, arguing that Christian versions of these events wouldn't be frowned upon in Western countries. Is that true?
It is in fact illegal for public schools in the United States to compel students to participate in religious worship or practices. It has also been upheld in the US Supreme Court that teacher-led prayers cannot be held in public schools because it is either exclusionary to non-participating students or marginalizing to those that do participate (depending on how it is presented). In the US, there are public and private schools, and some private schools are religious schools. This definitely happens in religious schools and is legal there, but it would become an ethics dispute if a public school attempted it. I think the closest I got to any forced religious exposure in my time at school was visiting the Washington National Cathedral, but that is also a place of architectural & historic significance in the US because some important individuals are buried there, like Woodrow Wilson (a former president) and Helen Keller. It was part of a voluntary trip to the capital, a relatively short part of the visit, and a service at the cathedral was not part of it.
 

Adorno

Bedroom Assassin
Duke
WBNWM&BVC
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I don't know of anything similar in Denmark. It's a very secular society. I'm quite sure it would be frowned upon.
But there are religious schools where attending church and routinely singing religious songs and such is common.
But that only bears resemblance to that thing in the article if the children are from a Muslim school.
And there's no Christian equivalent to Muslim headwear anyone is forced to wear.

That said, around the age of 14-15 a child can attend 'confirmation', which is a religious event (confirming your baptism).
It's of course voluntary, but very popular because they get big gifts (typically much more than on a birthday).
 

kurczak

Section Moderator
WB
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Even under literal communists, when we went on a school trip to a place, we stopped by to see the local churches on account of its historical or aesthetic importance. We didn't put on any headgear or long pants, but we were expected to be quiet and respectful. We certainly didn't participate in the Mass or any other rite, that would be at least a career-ending move for the teacher.
 

rektasaurus

Squire
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It is in fact illegal for public schools in the United States to compel students to participate in religious worship or practices. It has also been upheld in the US Supreme Court that teacher-led prayers cannot be held in public schools because it is either exclusionary to non-participating students or marginalizing to those that do participate (depending on how it is presented). In the US, there are public and private schools, and some private schools are religious schools. This definitely happens in religious schools and is legal there, but it would become an ethics dispute if a public school attempted it. I think the closest I got to any forced religious exposure in my time at school was visiting the Washington National Cathedral, but that is also a place of architectural & historic significance in the US because some important individuals are buried there, like Woodrow Wilson (a former president) and Helen Keller. It was part of a voluntary trip to the capital, a relatively short part of the visit, and a service at the cathedral was not part of it.
Grew up in the states. Went to public school all my life. In kindergarten our teachers took us on a field trip to a catholic church without indicating they would be taking kids to a church on the permission slip and sat us all down in pews and had someone come out and say a few words which I don't remember. During other periods of schooling, we were taken on field trips to missions, which are also churches, and has actual historical value and was conducted in a completely different context as opposed to the catholic church during kindergarten. Personally, I didn't mind it since I didn't see any religious indoctrination and thought it was a just a cool experience. You best believe we were never taken to any other type of place of worship, e.g. jehovah, latter day, protestant, jewish, hindu, muslim, etc.

Perhaps to give a little insight into the situation in Turkish mosques, although I can't see the picture and I'm not exactly sure about the rest of the context... it is forbidden for any tourists to enter any mosque without first being properly covered and robes or scarves are provided if they are wearing shorts, tanktops, etc. It probably has a lot less to do with 'indoctrinating' students than it does with showing 'respect' to the tradition of how people have been entering these places for 1000s of years and that is with covered knees, elbows, and womens' hair. Under no circumstances would any of the viewers be taught any religious dogma, prayers, or whatever, as that would go completely against the nature of islam, and in fact, out of respect for worshippers, I'd be pretty certain that they wouldn't even be allowed to view the prayers. Although it wouldn't surprise me if things are slightly different nowadays. Personally, I would like to see the same type of activity where turkish kids would be taken on a field trip to a church but maybe that step will hopefully come in the near future. I'm not sure about american kids today but I really can't imagine that any of them are being taken to mosques and at any rate religious homegenity in turkey far surpasses that of the united states so it's a completely different sort of deal.

Edit: just saw the picture. Holy cow the optics of that are pretty terrible. I can definitely see the kids being preached at there and it seems it goes way beyond polite covering up. Their T-shirts are saying something to the effect of “the apple of my eye is prayer”.

@Kentucky James VII canli bomba means “bombshell live breaking news”.
 
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