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kurczak

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Calling all weeaboos!

What's going on here?


What is the song called? Why is she wearing the kimono and why does she do the bowing and thanking mid-show? I'm guessing it is a traditional song of some sorts, but what sorts exactly? The arrangement and visuals are so different from the rest of the pop-rock show, but the people seem to respond well to it.
 

Bromden

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Calling all weeaboos!
Present!

What's going on here?
A concert!

What is the song called?
**** if I know!

Why is she wearing the kimono
Kimonos are still used as formal dresses!

why does she do the bowing and thanking mid-show? I'm guessing it is a traditional song of some sorts, but what sorts exactly?
By what I understand of the lyrics, it's a lovesong!

The arrangement and visuals are so different from the rest of the pop-rock show, but the people seem to respond well to it.
My guess is that it is either one of her most popular songs, one she became famous with or somesuch, or it's some very popular (karaoke) song everyone knows!
 
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I once saw a video of a woman in a Tokyo dancehall concert twerking in a kimono while an announcer shouted over the PA system in japanese patois. Like most sinosphere traditional dress it had a kind of nationalist-inspired revival in the late 20th century and is now mostly embedded into modern life. People wear kimonos to work or to events the same way a Scot might wear a kilt.
When I was in Chengdu in China, probably one in every 20 women was wearing han dynasty clothes.

The song doesn't sound traditional to me. Maybe the lyrics are, but it sounds way too informal.

Hey, I found it:
 

kurczak

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:ROFLMAO:

I thought it would be something like "Nippon stronk and biutiful, majestic mountain tops and cherry trees" etc etc and it's a song about a heartbroken woman smoking and getting ****faced in a bar.

Thanks for your input, the both of you.
 

Rujasu

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My guess is that it is either one of her most popular songs, one she became famous with or somesuch, or it's some very popular (karaoke) song everyone knows!
A quick dig shows that the song was probably her latest single at the time of that show. I guess the visuals are so different because why the hell not?
 
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You're also talking about the same country that did this:


The reason Japan seems so weird is that all their sacred feudal material culture just got swept up in the whirlwind of consumer capitalism in a way that never really happened in any other country. I don't think I've seen a single piece of Japanese media where they make fun of or even point out the fact that someone is wearing traditional clothing in public, even though it's regularly depicted.
 

Vedymin

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There's Catholics in Japan? Scorsese lied to me? Again?
Speaking of japan and catholic people I found this:

Here is a hard question:
Is anime dangerous to the mind?
 

Bromden

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There's Catholics in Japan? Scorsese lied to me? Again?
Many Japanese like to follow weird (to them) religions. I bet there are even Hasidic Jew Japanese out there too.

For the visuals of that gig, that concert smells of your usual dog and pony show. Which means it has all the visuals and effects but no real substance. I haven't watched the whole thing (why would anyone), but I wouldn't at all be surprised by the appearance of flying, transparent piano sporting neon lights (Yes, seen that happen when I worked at a huge dog and pony show).

And yes, anime is dangerous to the mind, but much less dangerous than catholicism.
 
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Many Japanese like to follow weird (to them) religions. I bet there are even Hasidic Jew Japanese out there too.
There are actually "native" catholics in japan though. There were some communities that date back to the sengoku period in the 1500s, and surprisingly enough it didn't just devolve into paganism like in every other place with isolated Catholicism.
 

Bromden

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Ah yes, I forgot that they had their own Jesus in the person of Shirō, and how he died in the Shimabara Uprising and came back as the antichrist, just to be defeated by the adventuring trio consisting of legendary ronin Miyamoto Musashi, master ninja Yagyu Jubei and grand wizard Takuan Soho .
 

kurczak

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Is anime dangerous to the mind?
I don't know, I don't think I have seen a minute of actual anime footage. Just some screencaps in memes I didn't get.

I haven't watched the whole thing (why would anyone)
Low effort bait, but I'll bite. It's a nostalgia trip plus a little curiosity. I didn't know she existed until a couple of weeks ago, but, she's about my age and her cheerful disposition and the late 80s/early 90s fashion and sound remind me of a time when I and perhaps the whole world had a little more cheerful disposition too.

On a more technical side, I admire that she sings live most of the time and is very rarely off key or out of breath despite running and jumping around like a duracell bunny 99% of the show. It also amuses me that although she obviously has a lot of energy and and is not rhythm deaf and the shows being huge, mainstream production that could certainly afford a team of choreographers and dance tutros, she kind of....can't dance. It's more jumping and fast, rhythmic pacing than actual dancing.
 

Bromden

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I wasn't baiting, I'm incapable of enjoying Jpop and don't understand the non-japanese people who do enjoy it. Also, I might have to hand in my weaboo license after saying this, but the high-pitched sounds Japanese women tend to make are bad for my nerves. It's not the case here though, her lower tone is tolerable.

The jumping while singing she does is indeed impressive. What is the opposite of impressive though is the music; it sounds like it's somewhere between MIDI tracks and gypsy wedding music. And it didn't really evolve since then, as Jpop sounds much the same today, so you can still find that same late 80s/early 90s sound and cheerful disposition there in a contemporary gig with a different squealing girl.
 

kurczak

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Other who are strictly pop don't really work for me. It's just her and only live. The studio versions of her songs are a little whatever, but something about her personally just does it for me.

There's some pretty good, more "adult" music about a decade before that though.

 
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I am confident that I could find at least one of the following documents before, but now I am unable to find them in National Archives. Could someone else also search for these to confirm me that they are removed(or I'm misremembering) so that I don't feel bad about being a dinosaur unable to complete the most basic digital tasks.
Despatch number 992, Embassy to SecState, “Turkish Election Day, July 21 46,” July 25, 1946, Classified General Records, Box 18, RG 84, National Archives
Despatch No 38, American Embassy Ankara to SecState, February 3, 1949. Top Secret General Records, Box 1, RG 84, National Archives.
 
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I remember the Turkish military being triggerred by this photo long ago. Some organisation organises event and takes students from 45 kindergartens to mosques, making kids to wear Islamic headwear. People found the opposition's sensibility extreme at that time, arguing that Christian versions of these events wouldn't be frowned upon in Western countries. Is that true?
 

Antonis

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Well, it depends. Here, in the great holidays, like before closing for Christmas or on some important Saint's day, the schools usually take the students to church. But when I was a student, we were not compelled to go, if we wanted, we just stayed at school, until the sermon was finished. 15 years later things are even more lax now. Speaking as a teacher, we still have to escort those who want in the chruch, but many of the students just hang out of the chruch, just to pass the time, without staying at school.