Please retain 'sexism' in M&B 2 Bannerlord.

Currently viewing this thread:

highsis

Regular
Best answers
0
Disclaimer: I'm neither a sexist nor a misogynist. I just love a realistic depiction in games of world that it emulates.

In my experience, too many medieval Europe-based RPGs, be it historical or fantasy, systematically eliminate sexism for political correctness and to avoid sexism controversy.

For instance, you see like 30% of foot soldiers being female warriors in Dragon Age Origins battles cut-scenes. This is totally fine if females are equally physically capable to males in DA lore; however, the role, demeanor, characteristics of women in Dragon Age world EXACTLY resemble that of real world; hence, 30% of foot soldiers being female is nothing more than a political correctness Bioware shoving down gamers' throat. Likewise, rapers, massacre, and tortures are depicted/insinuated in DA series but 'racism' is almost non-existent because of political correctness.

I recently started playing M&B and I'm VERY happy that the game did not shy away from depicting sexism prevalent in medieval society. I love playing both male and female characters, and when I played as a female, I found it very amusing, fun, and different from male play-through how lords looked down on me, how a lord refused me an entry to his castle when I was given a fiefdom, and how difficult it is to become a vassal or gain fiefs, and various remarks I got as a woman PC. It all added to immersion value and sense of realism.

Games shouldn't shy away from depicting truths and facts especially if it is historical. I do think these things in the game not only make it more diverse and fun experience playing different genders but also teach players about sexism in the past, which is actually a good thing for gender equality awareness. Teaching about the horrible labour conditions of children in 19th century Britain is not advocating child abuse; it's quite the contrary. Likewise, I hope more games don't hesitate depicting gender difference and racism which are wrong in modern society but which in fact did exist in the context of era the game is based on.

I really hope to see this penalties of being a female or a commoner retained in M&B 2 Bannerlord. For me, playing as a female commoner was the most fun in M&B Warband games I've played.


 

monoolho

Knight
M&BWBWF&SNWVC
Best answers
0
By the gods, I was really afraid when I read the first paragraph.

I agree with you. Retain the sexism. It's real enough. But there is no need for increased sexism, since that would detract too much from the game because... "well, This is Fiona #33, finally got the time and will to start this new game... and... Oh crap, I forgot I gotta do some poledancing and whoring first to raise the money to be allowed out of the city... Then I will need further money to buy sandals..."
In-game realism has a limit. You can't go all agnatic on a sandbox RPG, unless your character could die of old age and you could play as their daughter or something, then succession laws could follow... Still, what sense does it make if you're a horse trader?

But I agree, keeping the sexism the same as warband, it'd be very good.
 

crodio

Marquis
Best answers
0
Dunno, Calradia is a fantasy setting, I guess the devs are free to depict sexism, but I wouldn't say it's a must. I'd rather have it be a cultural trait for each faction (some factions extremely sexist, some egalitarian, some matriarchal?)
I think it is silly to speak about "truth and facts" when we talk about a game like this.
 

monoolho

Knight
M&BWBWF&SNWVC
Best answers
0
I also agree with that. Cannot deny that different levels of women influence by culture would be a bad idea. Then again, it is a fantasy setting. I do not personally care about the game being or not sexist because I never play as women, but as the OP said, it develops into different playstyle and a different experience overall, and that I cannot say is bad.
 
Best answers
2
crodio said:
Dunno, Calradia is a fantasy setting, I guess the devs are free to depict sexism, but I wouldn't say it's a must. I'd rather have it be a cultural trait for each faction (some factions extremely sexist, some egalitarian, some matriarchal?)
I think it is silly to speak about "truth and facts" when we talk about a game like this.
Plus the sexism in warband amounts only to a few minor stat differences and a tiny renown increase for becoming a vassal.

In practice however women are extremely overpowered due to some exploits you can do with husbands but not with wives. And getting a husband is piss easy, just ask random men if they wanna bone and face no negative consequences at all if you're rejected. No angry family either.

Warband had flippin' Sword Sisters in it for flip's sake, so comparing it to the real world can only go so far. This isn't KC:grin: so as long as there's no magic and no healing potions, it doesn't really matter.
 

Torrential

Veteran
WB
Best answers
0
SenpaiHinds said:
crodio said:
Dunno, Calradia is a fantasy setting, I guess the devs are free to depict sexism, but I wouldn't say it's a must. I'd rather have it be a cultural trait for each faction (some factions extremely sexist, some egalitarian, some matriarchal?)
I think it is silly to speak about "truth and facts" when we talk about a game like this.
Plus the sexism in warband amounts only to a few minor stat differences and a tiny renown increase for becoming a vassal.
Which is exactly why it worked well. It wasn't in your face over and over, but instead a bias, and sometimes a reason to fight a lord.

Its like being a non noble, I always played a non noble and often a female to give myself the hardest starts, usually a mod too :wink:.
 

Sarejo

Sergeant Knight at Arms
M&BWB
Best answers
0
This interview is relevant:

https://www.rockpapershotgun.com/2016/04/28/mount-and-blade-2-bannerlord-interview/


RPS: Why did you decide to set the game two hundred years earlier than Warband? (...)

One thing that opens up in this setting is the use of female characters. In Warband we had female nobles but they didn’t have armies and they weren’t commanders, because that didn’t fit with the time period. But if you go back in time a little bit, you see that a lot of societies did have female leaders. It was much more prevalent and it’s something that we’ve implemented. It’s an fascinating period to explore culturally and gives us a lot more freedom to create some new social dynamics.