General History Questions thread

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reza said:
for any indian historia or any historian out there

is there a source, or images, or bunch of reference image as to how indian soldier around chola's reign are dressed? or any indian soldier around 6-10 centuries

i only found statues and relief and.. im not sure if the soldier are really dressed like that. crazy luxuruous or just wearing a skirt
Hope this helps...

yhPWSa0.jpg

At3Vp91.jpg

load1459458186_012-03.jpg

load1459458283_012-05.jpg

Armies of the Middle Ages 2 by Ian Heath
(Wargames Research Group) comparison with later
14th century, Hindu and Muslim, Indian warriors. Could
still be helpful in understanding earlier Indian equipment...

load1505600402_018-4.jpg

load1505600379_018-3.jpg

load1505600358_018-2.jpg

load1505600331_018-1.jpg
 
matmohair1 said:
reza said:
for any indian historia or any historian out there

is there a source, or images, or bunch of reference image as to how indian soldier around chola's reign are dressed? or any indian soldier around 6-10 centuries

i only found statues and relief and.. im not sure if the soldier are really dressed like that. crazy luxuruous or just wearing a skirt
Hope this helps...

yhPWSa0.jpg

At3Vp91.jpg

load1459458186_012-03.jpg

load1459458283_012-05.jpg

Armies of the Middle Ages 2 by Ian Heath
(Wargames Research Group) comparison with later
14th century, Hindu and Muslim, Indian warriors. Could
still be helpful in understanding earlier Indian equipment...

load1505600402_018-4.jpg

load1505600379_018-3.jpg

load1505600358_018-2.jpg

load1505600331_018-1.jpg

thanks mat, very helpful  :smile:
 
Kentucky James said:
kalashnjkov said:
Why do the mongol prefer to use lamellar, leather armor over chainmail and plate armor?

The Mongols inherited the use of lamellar from the Chinese, as with most of the rest of their armour. Prior to the fall of the Song dynasty it's evident that east/central asian nomads would have stolen/bought most of their armour from China. For example, silk undercoats were common armour for horse archers, and there was no silk production in central asia at that time. Furthermore the Song dynasty had a professional army with standardised mass-produced equipment, and would have had immense numbers of modular lamellar outfits that were designed to be adjusted in size. It's extremely unlikely that steppe nomads could produce lamellar or chainmail on their own, but given the abundance of lamellar in the region it only made sense to use it.

Lamellar is also a lot better at arrow deflection rather than absorbtion, and the mongols would have encountered lots of arrows. If you're wearing chainmail and you get shot in the chest with an arrow, you probably won't die. But you'll have a barbed arrow sticking out of you. Primary sources during the crusades tell of chainmail armed horsemen who were almost unable to move because of how many arrows would be stuck in them. The advantage of lamellar was a much lower chance that an arrow would get stuck. The gigantic pauldrons on lamellar also act like small shields for protecting the face when the arms are raised, which tends to favour horse archers more than chainmail does.

Do they borrow some from Qara Khitai ?
 
Why do ambushes ever happen in premodern (i.e. before the seven years war) warfare? I assume campaigning armies would have networks of scouts and skirmishing parties around and ahead of them, so how is one army ever able to "sneak up" on another?

Also, the only example of such a battle I can think of off the top of my head is Teutoberger Wald, and even then I'm not sure if the battle itself was an immediate ambush or whether the Romans were just mildly surprised or something. Are there any other major examples?
 
Battle of Trebia and Trasimele Lake count as ambushes too I guess. Teutoburg Forrest can be blamed on betrayal though.
Battle of Sterling (Stirling?) Bridge (you know, with William Wallace) was sort of an ambush too.
 
Kentucky James said:
Why do ambushes ever happen in premodern (i.e. before the seven years war) warfare? I assume campaigning armies would have networks of scouts and skirmishing parties around and ahead of them, so how is one army ever able to "sneak up" on another?

I'd say mostly incompetence. If, for example, you look at the Battle of Mollwitz...
 
Kentucky James said:
Why do ambushes ever happen in premodern (i.e. before the seven years war) warfare? I assume campaigning armies would have networks of scouts and skirmishing parties around and ahead of them, so how is one army ever able to "sneak up" on another?

That's not always the case. In the American Civil War there were plenty of situations where armies just kind of bumbled along into each other: Antietam and Gettysburg, for instance. Part of it can be explained by inadequate scouting, but a good part is just the state of communications before the 20th century, particularly when hampered by forest cover or other difficult terrain.
 
Someone can tell me informations about forgotten medieval events as Conquest of West Friesland

Floris V was grandson or great grandson to Floris IV, namesake of Floris mod, exist accounts of Persijin family?
 
Does anyone have any idea of what the 33rd Regiment of Foots uniform was like during their time in india before shipping back to Europe for the latter part of the Napoleonic wars? I can't seem to find much information on it.
 
Just any information on what they wore at the time. All I know is that when they returned from india, they were re-kitted to match the newer standard, that being grey trousers with belgic shakos and some other bits.
 
Wigster600 said:
Does anyone have any idea of what the 33rd Regiment of Foots uniform was like during their time in india before shipping back to Europe for the latter part of the Napoleonic wars? I can't seem to find much information on it.
hope this helps...

British Napoleonic Uniforms by C.E. Franklin

Assaye 1803 (Osprey Campaign) by Simon Millar and Peter Dennis

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zzYwAuL.jpg
 
They went to India in 1797, so they'd most likely have been dressed along the lines of the following image (with the correct regimental distinctions, obviously), although it's possible they were in the 1796 pattern coat with the squared lapels.

8ELsowu.png

Soldiers serving in either of the Indies were authorised to wear top hat and white trousers. They'd have received the new patterns of coats and shakoes as they were adopted, but it usually took a couple years for changes to reach troops in India. Sometimes regiments would have new uniforms made in India and such coats were often simpler and lacked lace.
 
Tennessee Jack said:
They'd have received the new patterns of coats and shakoes as they were adopted, but it usually took a couple years for changes to reach troops in India. Sometimes regiments would have new uniforms made in India and such coats were often simpler and lacked lace.

"Armies of the East India Company" 1750–1850,
by Stuart Reid and Gerry Embleton - Osprey

QLiZKL0.jpg
 
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