Funny historic art

Mamlaz

Sergeant Knight at Arms
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jacobhinds said:
Europeans aren't the only xenophobes.
Well I found it very hard to find any info on the authors.

The images themselves were digitalized by the Waseda University;

http://archive.wul.waseda.ac.jp/kosho/chi04/chi04_01029/chi04_01029.html
 

Kentucky James VII

BioAfrikaner
Duke
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Mamlaz said:
jacobhinds said:
Europeans aren't the only xenophobes.
Well I found it very hard to find any info on the authors.

The images themselves were digitalized by the Waseda University;

http://archive.wul.waseda.ac.jp/kosho/chi04/chi04_01029/chi04_01029.html
The authors remained anonymous, as did all but a couple of woodblock printers (allowed them to escape scandal or political controversy in their work). But it's fair to assume they were made in Japan by Japanese artists.

Although van Gogh and Monet (and the entire Art Nouveau movement) incorporated elements of Ukiyo-e into their prints, nobody outside the archipelago ever copied the style or techniques for themselves since they just couldn't be bothered.

Similarly, the Japanese liked some of the techniques used by Dutch painters, but never bothered replicating them.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/He-gassen
 

Kentucky James VII

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Duke
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PinCushion said:
So why are they not farting on westerners then? Too edgy perhaps?
They are, it's just that the artist hasn't made it as blindingly obvious as other artists who would give them bulging blue eyes and ragged red hair. They're mostly farting at other Japanese people though.
 

Mamlaz

Sergeant Knight at Arms
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Medieval female empowerment;



It looks unfair on first glance, but if you look closer, you will realize he knows kung fu.
 

Untitled.

Count
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The attachment is long enough to hit her own fingers. Seems somewhat impractical. Spool of thread is much more useful in a combat situation.
 

Mamlaz

Sergeant Knight at Arms
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Gestricius said:
Looks like a ornate flail attached to a padded cushion.
Haha, I just imagined a medieval woman hiding a mace in her threading cushion for protection, would have been quite a surprise  :mrgreen:

It is actually a threading distaff;

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ShSIOF0o5js

For some reason, really prominent in imagery depicting violent women;






I believe it is the medieval equivalent of a woman beating a man with a frying pan or some other appliance that is traditionally connected to a womans role.
 

Kentucky James VII

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Duke
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PinCushion said:
Hm. Could you point out the western dudes?
Thing is, they're all wearing Japanese clothing so it could be any of them. This was drawn before most artists had access to Europeans so they probably just winged it
 

RC-1136

Baron
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Maybe I have just a simple humour but when I went through a roll of arms from 1480 (Conrad Grünenbergs Wappenbuch) yesterday and stumpled across this I had a good laugh:


It's the coat of arms of the Counts of Celje.

There are other great pictures in the book like several noblemen's coats of arms depicting the french tricolour (including a suitable helmet with crest) or a dog king surrounded by his dog-court.  :lol: