• The forum has been updated. For an explanation of some of the changes, head over here.

Fitness and all things fitness related (AKA: Eat your goddamn oats.)

Currently viewing this thread:

fysaga

Sergeant Knight at Arms
WB
Just **** around with what feels comfortable for you. Some worldclass Powerlifters go wide, others low while squatting. Personal anatomy.
 

kurczak

Section Moderator
WB
I'm sorry, but that's terrible advice. As I said above, spreading the feet when squatting heavy can be a choice to maximize the lift. That's different from not being able to squat just your own body or even walk or stand with parallel. I guarantee you 100% that none of top powerlifters or weightlifters have duck feet as a permanent syndrome. If they did, they wouldn't be top lifters.

Telling someone who's just starting to work out to just find whatever stance is comfortable is just guiding them into inevitable injury. For them it's 99.99% of the time not personal anatomy or a deliberate choice when they.are maxing out a million pounds, but bad flexibility. It's like "teaching" someone how to drive by telling "oh you know, just grab the wheel and go for what feels natural, Schumacher does. Or, well, did." (Inb4 jacob says that's exactly how his Jamaican grandma taught him to drive)

Most people who have been sedentary need to re-learn basically all movement patterns and work on their flexibility before they are allowed anywhere near weights. What feels natural to their sedentary bodies, is not natural at all
 
Regarding situps, what is the best position for your arms to be at? I tend to have my arms infront of me, with each hand on the opposite shoulder, using my elbows as a marker when they pass over my knees, i've not had any issues with situps, I just wondered whether this is the proper way or if having ones hands behind their head is the proper way instead, if there is one.
 

Varalir

Sergeant Knight

Found this on squats, do you disagree with this Kurczac? Sounds like he knows what he's talking about although you do too.

TL;DR: He says that because of hip bone structure position of the femur some people will find it better to use wider stances while doing the squat.
 

Varalir

Sergeant Knight
Been doing loads of stretches and workouts for the back and the gluteus minimus especially. My back is now worse.

Think I need a professional.
 

Bromden

Archduke
You don't do stretches nor serious workout on your aching parts. Light warmups, lots of circular movements well within stretching limits, etc., but not straining the bad areas. What you need is looking up some back trainings for pensioners and doing them regularly and lightly, not ripping yourself apart where it hurts.
 

๖Kern

Grandmaster Knight
WBNW
Hey guys!

Just to introduce myself, I have been doing ice hockey intensively (6 trainings, 2 matches a week) for around 12 years. I've finished my "career" 1 year ago and around 4 months ago, I started doing gym.

I have a question though, how exactly does intensity, volume and frequency affect muscle growth, strength and so on..?
 

Kharille

Knight at Arms
Do some minor exertion, and focus on rebuilding.  We call that anabolism.  The formation of complex structures, proteins and mass by assembling amino acid components.  You can compare long distance runners with sprinters, see which physique you prefer to have. 
 

kurczak

Section Moderator
WB
Grönsíir said:

Found this on squats, do you disagree with this Kurczac? Sounds like he knows what he's talking about although you do too.

TL;DR: He says that because of hip bone structure position of the femur some people will find it better to use wider stances while doing the squat.
Have you watched the video to the end? He clearly says at 7:00 that the difference can be in soft tissue and not necessarily in bone structure itself. I can't comment on the core idea, I'm not an orthopedist. Although testing maximum rotation while sitting is a, uhm, curious idea. More importantly, he's, I assume, talking about heavy squatting with a barbell, not about squatting with just your own body.
kurczak said:
For really heavy squatting maybe some rotation is ok, but even then it should be a conscious decision, not something your body forces you to do.
If you have hundreds of pounds on your back or shoulders and you want to rotate your hips to get the abductors or whatever more engaged and help you out, fine. But in your case, or at least what I got from it, your feet are externally rotated all the time, standing, sitting, walking squatting. That is 100% not right and 99.99% not caused by your bone structure.

Forget about weights, maintaining a position like this

image012.jpg

AsianSquat.jpg


with a fairly narrow stance and basically parallel feet should be normal, this is how the good lord intended it. By maintaining I mean sitting for at least minutes comfortably, not just getting there, powering through for a couple of seconds being all tense and then getting up. Toddlers and a lot of third worlders who have not yet been ruined by thousands and thousands of accumulated hours of sitting in chairs can do it easily. It's not some circque du soleil ****, it's (should be) normal. Personally, I think anyone who can't do that should be banned from squatting (with weights), deadlifting, let alone Olympic weightlifting.

Grönsíir said:
Been doing loads of stretches and workouts for the back and the gluteus minimus especially. My back is now worse.

Think I need a professional.
Yeah you probably do. You may have a herniated disk, or your hips are just so tight even stretching hurts them or you're stretching exceptionally wrong :razz: What exactly were you doing?

๖Kern said:
Hey guys!

Just to introduce myself, I have been doing ice hockey intensively (6 trainings, 2 matches a week) for around 12 years. I've finished my "career" 1 year ago and around 4 months ago, I started doing gym. I have a question though, how exactly does intensity, volume and frequency affect muscle growth, strength and so on..?
Inb4 "sets of five for strength, sets of 8 to 12 for hypertrophy"

Hey! That's a very vague question, I don't think there is any universally agreed upon formula. You must have some experience from your hockey days what works for you, no?
 

๖Kern

Grandmaster Knight
WBNW
kurczak said:
Inb4 "sets of five for strength, sets of 8 to 12 for hypertrophy"

Hey! That's a very vague question, I don't think there is any universally agreed upon formula. You must have some experience from your hockey days what works for you, no?

You do not really get much knowledge about weightlifting etcetera when you play hockey... We had 1-2 strength trainings (which also wasn't entirely weightlifting) a week, but I was never really thinking about the muscle growth. Everything was mostly about condition and dexterity, not saying that strength wasn't an important factor though.
 

kurczak

Section Moderator
WB
Hm, ok. At any rate, I don't think I can help you. My entire strength training has always been running-related, so it's just been squats and its multitude of variations and cleans. And pull-ups for some reason that I don't understand to this day.
 

Antoine de Saint-Exupéry

Dancing to electro-pop like a robot since 1984
Subforum Moderator
M&BWBNWWF&SVC
Something something 50% of your running speed comes from your arms

Or more srsly, using your arms correctly (and having them not be made of paper) can contribute significantly to both your endurance and your speed. Or something.
 

kurczak

Section Moderator
WB
Ok, so if we're being serious, then I think the reasoning behind doing an upper back exercise was to help keep a proper torso angle and not slouch.
 

Varalir

Sergeant Knight
@Kurczac
Huh, I thought he put more emphasis on the idea of different stances for different people. What ev's, straight feet clearly are the better option so I'm trying to correct my posture. It's hard. Back is still horrible. The exercises I were mainly to strengthen the Gluteus minimus muscle. It worked like a charm. Each time after I did them my back felt like it had an orgasm. But then one day it just stopped working. And my back got worse afterwards.
 

Densetsu

Age of Empires II
Marquis
Training for my first half marathon, boys.

I used to be a sprinter, 100 metres in about 11 seconds.

I have long legs and a slender body with the potential for extreme stamina.

I have 6 months to train for it.

Many of my friends are joining to.

I have infinite motivation.

I must buy some new running shoes.

Those running watches with the GPS cost a fookin' bomb, ya ****s.
 
Top Bottom