Building pc for Bannerlord

Cilcain

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Ryzen 5 2600
Amd Radeon RX590
16GB 3000 Mhz ram
This is my system and from my beta experience, it is really enough.
Does the beta support battles with large numbers of bots? That's where the CPU will be hammered I think. That said, a Ryzen 2600 is not far off the "recommended" spec, so it wouldn't surprise me if you're right and it proves to be enough. Good to hear your experience anyway.
 

DreadZep

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Omg man, if you have so much experience please just accept that you are wrong and computer cases are not medical equipment.

There are 2 components that output the majority of the heat, CPU and GPU, which both are only in contact with the case by a couple of screws so the conduction of heat is ****.
The coolant of a water cooled loop is not more than a delta Temperature of 10 degrees compared to ambient, then it is considered fine. A heatsink on a cpu get's to about 40-50 degrees.

So a fan blows the hot air, which probably won't get much hotter than 35-40 degrees, through the heatsink and then another fan blows it out of the case (water cooling it could be the same fan). So the heat is blown out of the back, which may cause the back of the case to heat up a little. Then fresh cool air is blown in from the front where the case has not heated up.....
A case is not made from 1 piece of metal and only connected by screws so the conductivity between the front and back is ****.

So then I can think of 1 more argument why it would help with thermal if the case is from metal which is that the air inside the case heats up and so does the case. But if the heatsinks get up to 40-50 degrees then the air probably won't be much hotter than 35. So, if it would possibly work that way, the case would become 35 degrees and then? Not cool down because the case doesn't have fins and barely any airflow?

Cases are made from metal because it is cheap sturdy and light, for thermals it does not make a noticeable difference.

Airflow is so much more important than the conductivity of the case that it makes the difference negligible.

Also apparently you have no idea who GamersNexus is and are calling them shills for money, you are certainly not in the PC building market if you call them that. You say I should trust you (a random stranger) because you rant a bit about science which is not applicable, you look more like a Corsair shill than anything else.
The higher the ambient temperature, the lower amount of heat the coolant can carry... this does not scale linearly. The ambient temperature inside the case is defined by many factors, the material the case is made out of, the total volume of air and exhaust rate, the water content of the air and the temperature outside the case. Having a case with a high heat capacitance is a huge advantage, no matter how you slice it. Further more, cases designed to blow air out of the back do not take advantage of the natural tenancy of heat to rise in elevation. So, not only does the obsidian have a solid chuck of aluminum to stabilize the ambient temperature inside the case, it also has a top flow design to take full advantage of the natural tenancy of heat to travel up, instead of bottle necking all the heat towards the back of the case near the CPU and GPU, like in the design you have suggested. Also you don't seem to appreciate the material science of aluminum, and the fact that it is commonly used as a material in case designs despite the fact that it isnt the cheapest or sturdiest material to use. What can I say, you can lead a horse to water but you can't make them drink. I suggest you find a case that has a high aluminum content in its construction and top flow design for your next build.
 

Horatius

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The higher the ambient temperature, the lower amount of heat the coolant can carry... this does not scale linearly. The ambient temperature inside the case is defined by many factors, the material the case is made out of, the total volume of air and exhaust rate, the water content of the air and the temperature outside the case. Having a case with a high heat capacitance is a huge advantage, no matter how you slice it. Further more, cases designed to blow air out of the back do not take advantage of the natural tenancy of heat to rise in elevation. So, not only does the obsidian have a solid chuck of aluminum to stabilize the ambient temperature inside the case, it also has a top flow design to take full advantage of the natural tenancy of heat to travel up, instead of bottle necking all the heat towards the back of the case near the CPU and GPU, like in the design you have suggested. Also you don't seem to appreciate the material science of aluminum, and the fact that it is commonly used as a material in case designs despite the fact that it isnt the cheapest or sturdiest material to use. What can I say, you can lead a horse to water but you can't make them drink. I suggest you find a case that has a high aluminum content in its construction and top flow design for your next build.
1. Many tests have proven that turning a case upside down does not matter or are within the error of margin because the case is provided with airflow by the fans which is quite a bit stronger than the heat rises argument.
2. Your 450D is like almost any case designed for front to back airflow because bottom to top is obstructed by the floor and GPU.
3. Give me a good source to believe that it actually makes a difference that the case is made of metal and I will shut up about it and admit I'm wrong. I have been searching but there is nothing. Show me that the heat capitance of a case is a huge advantage and I will scurry off. Otherwise I will not be looking at how much aluminum there is in case but rather be looking at how it performs and the build quality.
 

DreadZep

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1. Many tests have proven that turning a case upside down does not matter or are within the error of margin because the case is provided with airflow by the fans which is quite a bit stronger than the heat rises argument.
2. Your 450D is like almost any case designed for front to back airflow because bottom to top is obstructed by the floor and GPU.
3. Give me a good source to believe that it actually makes a difference that the case is made of metal and I will shut up about it and admit I'm wrong. I have been searching but there is nothing. Show me that the heat capitance of a case is a huge advantage and I will scurry off. Otherwise I will not be looking at how much aluminum there is in case but rather be looking at how it performs and the build quality.
"many tests" ill assume is in place of actual evidence for your claim that turning an *unspecified* case upside down does not matter, and so you should rely solely on the quality of your fans for the entire life of a PC... since no other factors can possibly contribute to or improve the heat exchange properties inside your case. Seriously that is your argument? lol

You don't need to get stuck on the obsidian series, which isnt limited to the 450d that I linked. That's just the one I personally use and can attest for. and you are wrong, it has feet that elevates it approx 2 inches off the ground... which if nothing else should at least provide the implication that you shouldnt let the bottom of the case airflow get obstructed. It's not the only case designed that way, look for any case with high aluminum content and top flow design, and you can't go wrong.

A good source? see any science textbook, turn to the thermal dynamics chapter, find the section which describes the properties of aluminum, such as it's higher thermal exchange rate compared to any other metal. Couple that with the fact that any major super computer or server room uses computer floors, which the equipment racks sit on top of and channel air up from bellow the floor thru the equipment and into the ceiling exhaust system.
 
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Horatius

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"many tests" ill assume is in place of actual evidence for your claim that turning an *unspecified* case upside down does not matter, and so you should rely solely on the quality of your fans for the entire life of a PC... since no other factors can possibly contribute to or improve the heat exchange properties inside your case. Seriously that is your argument? lol

You don't need to get stuck on the obsidian series, which isnt limited to the 450d that I linked. That's just the one I personally use and can attest for. and you are wrong, it has feet that elevates it approx 2 inches off the ground... which if nothing else should at least provide the implication that you shouldnt let the bottom of the case airflow get obstructed. It's not the only case designed that way, look for any case with high aluminum content and top flow design, and you can't go wrong.

A good source? see any science textbook, turn to the thermal dynamics chapter, find the section which describes the properties of aluminum, such as it's higher thermal exchange rate compared to any other metal. Couple that with the fact that any major super computer or server room uses computer floors, which the equipment racks sit on top of and channel air up from bellow the floor thru the equipment and into the ceiling exhaust system.
I don't care about the scientific stuff, I get that enough at University. It doesn't matter what text books say, it matters what the testing says. I have yet to find any benchmark supporting your claim.

If it top to bottom really is the best airflow then please explain to me why almost every case comes in stock configuration front to back? Which they do test?
 

DreadZep

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I don't care about the scientific stuff, I get that enough at University. It doesn't matter what text books say, it matters what the testing says. I have yet to find any benchmark supporting your claim.

If it top to bottom really is the best airflow then please explain to me why almost every case comes in stock configuration front to back? Which they do test?
Look if you really want me to write a book in the comment section about the history of ATX form factor and case design, don't tempt me, because I'll do it. Suffice to say, while top flow case designs do have a footing in the custom PC market place, they have to compete with an obsolete design that is cheaper to manufacture and requires less engineering, which is propped up by evil companies like DELL who have been outed in the past for planned obsolescence engineering practices. The benefits of those harder to engineer designs extend mostly to the end user, since the amount of time it would take for the benefits of one case vs another could be years or even decades to finally realize. I would pay more attention to my university books and what I can test in my own lab if I were you, don't put much stock in benchmark advertisements... since it's pretty obvious those reviewers have a clear incentive to give biased reviews, and the history of custom pc hardware marketing is filled with examples of these biased benchmark reviews.
 

RomerG21

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Ryzen 5 2600
Amd Radeon RX590
16GB 3000 Mhz ram
This is my system and from my beta experience, it is really enough.
Can you try custom battle mod with 300 v300 and 500 v 500 battles in ultra settings ? I have same setup amd i have no beta:sad:
 

Beasthoven

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1. Why 32GB?
2. Why a i7 9700? Makes no sense. It is twice as expensive as a 3600 and it doesn't even include a cooler. Performs the same in games and has 4 less threads. It is a gaming pc so a 3600 makes way more sense.
3. He is probably gaming at 1080p which makes a 2070S way overpowered and expensive, get a 1660Ti/5600Xt/2060 for 1080p gaming, there is no need for it.

This is senseless money spending, he first wanted a 3400G and you recommend a PC for 1700 euros, that's insane.

I quickly made this list: https://pcpartpicker.com/list/CcKWJb
Is less than a grand and should do more than well in 1080p for the coming years.
You do realize that people dont only buy a PC for Bannerlord, right? And while a 3600 might be sufficient for Bannerlord, you go ahead and try it on RDR2. Ik the result of that. So better invest a bit more and make it last longer than just buying ****e, no offence to the 2060.

+ 1.700€ is NOTHING for a Gaming PC. If you want a proper Beast of a PC, u‘ll need at least 3.000€
 

Horatius

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You do realize that people dont only buy a PC for Bannerlord, right? And while a 3600 might be sufficient for Bannerlord, you go ahead and try it on RDR2. Ik the result of that. So better invest a bit more and make it last longer than just buying ****e, no offence to the 2060.

+ 1.700€ is NOTHING for a Gaming PC. If you want a proper Beast of a PC, u‘ll need at least 3.000€
o_O a 2060 runs 60fps on high on RDR2 1080p that is more than enough.....
You are better of buying a GPU for half of the price now and have 60fps and another time in 3 year than now a twice as expensive GPU and in 6 years another one because that 3-year-old GPU will perform better.

Not all people have 3k to spend or even 1,7K, you can build an eSports pc for 600 and a fine one for 900-1200. If you want 4k or high Hz then you are going to pay indeed.