Britannia 1080 mod General discusion thread/Progress report

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demonace

Recruit
This mod loock promising ! Congrulation for the beta !! i give it a try this weeck . keep going dude , cheers !
 

Mathra

Recruit
I can't seem to be able to launch the mod, as I'm getting the following error upon load:

"Unable to open file: CommonRes\human_anim.brf"
 

Dimos

Banned
You have the 1.003 version? That BETA is for the 0.960. You can install the 0.960 version to another folder on  your pc and play the mod. I hope, I'll find some time to fix some issues about the mod...

 

BoJIxB

Veteran
This mod is one of the best I ever seen!
But I found one bug, or something like that. It is very difficult or even impossible to travel from Bengor (Wales) to Castletown (Island of Man). Only through Ireland... P.S. Sorry for bad English.
...and, please, add some bandits to land of Ireland - without people it looks strange...
 

Mathra

Recruit
Dimos said:
You have the 1.003 version? That BETA is for the 0.960. You can install the 0.960 version to another folder on  your pc and play the mod. I hope, I'll find some time to fix some issues about the mod...
Lulz, I R retarded. I completely missed that it was for 0.960.
 

Dimos

Banned
BoJIxB: Thanks for your good comments... That bug existed before I fixed the map and it remains... I hope I'll fix it in the next release... Now I will work on the troops... Cheers  :grin:

Mathra: Never mind, you see I cannot post that to 1.003 till the module system comes out... Have fun and hunt bugs!  :wink:

To all: I'm waiting your comments so as to improove the mod and the team needs some moddelers and scripters... Actually, I can script some aspects, but a more experienced scripter  will be welcome! Thanks

Edit: If you like the mod add the signature I made for it...
 

Audun

Knight
WB
Dimos, don't work the crap out of you converting this from .960 to present version, just wait man. I'm sure it won't take long time before the module system is released. Perhaps you should rather be making scenes, polishing something?

I don't mean to be a fascist dictator here, but I think this is good advice. :wink:
 

Somairle

Knight
I think this is what you meant, Dimos, so, reposting this here;

I'd like to help with this, but mainly I focus on Gaels, and the clothing and animals they had, and the food (every aspect of history needs SOME ONE to study it). Armies too, but, mostly I study the society itself. Could be helpful though, particularly in Ireland. Some specifics, if you're going for historical accuracy. If I say Gaels, I mean both Irish and Scottish Gaels, and usually Norse-Gaels as well (the people of Mann, the Hebrides, Galwegians, and the Norse towns in Ireland), if I say Irish or Scots or Norse-Gaels, just that one group.

Kilts don't exist. Gaels wear three things depending on station.

Labourers and other low class tribesmen (Ireland) or clansmen (Scotland) wear trousers or shorts with a shirt, and sometimes a wool cloak. They wear the same thing in battle.

The freemen, clergy, and nobles wear a knee-length shirt, with a bare legs, a belt, and a short cloak in plaid, stripes, or checkers. More colors (and darker colors) imply one is higher class. They wear shoes or boots, sometimes with a wrap that covers to the knee, but do not often wear trousers or tights, as they are considered below their station.

Nobles, as well as clergy, may also elect to wear looser robes, still accompanied by a cloak, often longer. In battle, this is still usually pulled up to the knee.

Horsemen and archers often wear hoods if they don't have a helmet.

Almost all Gaelic soldiers carry darts or javelins of some type.

The Isle of Man was ruled by Godred Crovan, also called Gofraid mac meic Arailt, a Gaelo-Norseman (dressed in the Gaelic fashion, spoke a Gaelic language, but could identify himself as either). He also ruled the Hebrides. He actually ruled FROM the Hebrides, not Mann, as he had just conquered Mann in 1079 (it had previously been in the possession of a Leinsterian lord in Ireland, as the king of Mann before Godred Crovan was Godred Sigtryggsson, who was a fairly loyal subject of Murchad mac Diarmata).

It's a pretty nice period for Ireland. Toirdelbach Ua Briain is High King of Ireland, and he's crushed what remains of his opposition. While Ulster and parts of Connacht are essentially independent, they are no threat to him and after some aborted attempts to conquer the regions, he laid off, and enjoyed the fact that he controlled about three-quarters of Ireland (Munster, Leinster, Meath, and part of Connacht). Ireland also still has Norse-Gaelic towns in addition to forts and early pre-Norman Irish proto-castles (few of those remain, as the Normans, then English built over the top of them, since they were already in good defensive positions). The Irish golden age is coming to an end, but the Irish are still actually among the more advanced peoples in western Europe, namely in astronomy and medicine (for a long period in centuries prior, monks studying medicine in northern Europe almost invariably studied in Ireland, as they had Greek medical texts as well as extensive native medicine and research). The Irish are on alright terms with the Roman and Greek churches (Irish priests even acted as moderators at times in discussions between the Popes and Patriarchs, though both were a bit suspicious of the Irish, which led to the Irish getting involved with the Crusades, specifically in Iberia, to restore the Pope's trust in them, and the formal adoption of the Roman rite). While small, the country actually has a bit of clout at the time. Too many people assume Ireland was this perpetually backwards country, without realizing that doesn't really begin in earnest until about 1250 (a good 75-ish years after the Norman invasion), with major slow downs in development due to incessant warfare, though things were winding down from about 1100 as the country began to feudalize, disrupting quite a bit.

Norse-Gaels had more armor, came from the cities (like Cork, Limerick, Dublin, and Wexford), and employed less cavalry. However, they fought pretty similar to the Gaels, just, with better armor and less horsemen. They were all subjects of Gaelic kings at this point, but did have a slightly unique culture, which was similar to that of the Manx, as well as the Hebrideans, Galwegians, and northernmost Scottish clans.

The native Gaelic sword is a short, broad-bladed sword with no guard, primarily for thrusting. It's more of a long dagger, similar to the Roman gladius. However, these were being phased out among actual warriors with Norse-styled swords, though featuring Gaelic designs (like S- and V-guards). Gaels also used battle axes, cudgels, and many, many spears of various lengths, from very short thrusting spears, to long two-handed pikes, called geadus. Javelins were extremely common, from the small dart (a javelin about a third the length of a normal javelin), to slightly larger javelins, to small throwing spears, up to the very heavy throwing spears and harpoons. Archers were most common with tribes and clans that lived on islands or near the sea (they used them from boats in sea engagements), but existed elsewhere. Munster even had two-thousand longbowmen (imitating Welsh mercenaries) guarding the citadel of Casiel (modern Cashel). However, slings were also still in use, as they are longer range and more accurate than a regular bow (but require more space to use them, since you have to swing your arm out wide, hence why bows were more useful on ships).

Gaelic horsemen ride ponies, not larger horses, as the places they live are mostly uneven, soft, forested, or rocky terrain, and ponies navigate such places far easier than horses. Scots would eventually use large Norman destriers in southern Scotland, but even then, highland cavalry was pony-mounted.

Gaelic armor for most was a leather vest or a padded coat (a cuton or acton) worn over their shirt. Wealthier would have a mail shirt or coat, called Luireach. Shields were mainly small and rectangular or circular (the targe didn't exist yet though), faced with leather, and rarely had designs. Wealthier warriors employed Norman-styled heaters and kite shields though. Helmets were mostly leather caps (though some were very thick with a kind of 'crown', like a leather flat-top helmet), but, again, the wealthy had iron helmets, usually conical without a nose-guard, but some did use nose-guards. Helmets were sometimes rather decorative, with plumes or crests.

And I can't make them, it's something to keep in mind if you get a modeler though. Mind also, two-handed swords didn't exist in large numbers yet, they'd be so rare as to require them to be custom-produced. Two-handed swords in Britain and Ireland later used imported German-made blades affixed to locally produced hilts. 1080 is before that mass production of large blades began, so they had to be made custom by local smiths. Any regular soldier should not possess one. Heroes maybe, or maybe have one as a quest reward. The High King of Ireland should have one, it was his grandfather's (Brian Boru's), which was returned to him as a gift by Diarmait, king of Leinster, when Toirdelbach was just king of Munster. There is a photo of the original from the early 1900s, but it has since been stolen.

Hope any of that helps.
 

GodsHand

Veteran
Somairle said:
I think this is what you meant, Dimos, so, reposting this here;

I'd like to help with this, but mainly I focus on Gaels, and the clothing and animals they had, and the food (every aspect of history needs SOME ONE to study it). Armies too, but, mostly I study the society itself. Could be helpful though, particularly in Ireland. Some specifics, if you're going for historical accuracy. If I say Gaels, I mean both Irish and Scottish Gaels, and usually Norse-Gaels as well (the people of Mann, the Hebrides, Galwegians, and the Norse towns in Ireland), if I say Irish or Scots or Norse-Gaels, just that one group.

Kilts don't exist. Gaels wear three things depending on station.

Labourers and other low class tribesmen (Ireland) or clansmen (Scotland) wear trousers or shorts with a shirt, and sometimes a wool cloak. They wear the same thing in battle.

The freemen, clergy, and nobles wear a knee-length shirt, with a bare legs, a belt, and a short cloak in plaid, stripes, or checkers. More colors (and darker colors) imply one is higher class. They wear shoes or boots, sometimes with a wrap that covers to the knee, but do not often wear trousers or tights, as they are considered below their station.

Nobles, as well as clergy, may also elect to wear looser robes, still accompanied by a cloak, often longer. In battle, this is still usually pulled up to the knee.

Horsemen and archers often wear hoods if they don't have a helmet.

Almost all Gaelic soldiers carry darts or javelins of some type.

The Isle of Man was ruled by Godred Crovan, also called Gofraid mac meic Arailt, a Gaelo-Norseman (dressed in the Gaelic fashion, spoke a Gaelic language, but could identify himself as either). He also ruled the Hebrides. He actually ruled FROM the Hebrides, not Mann, as he had just conquered Mann in 1079 (it had previously been in the possession of a Leinsterian lord in Ireland, as the king of Mann before Godred Crovan was Godred Sigtryggsson, who was a fairly loyal subject of Murchad mac Diarmata).

It's a pretty nice period for Ireland. Toirdelbach Ua Briain is High King of Ireland, and he's crushed what remains of his opposition. While Ulster and parts of Connacht are essentially independent, they are no threat to him and after some aborted attempts to conquer the regions, he laid off, and enjoyed the fact that he controlled about three-quarters of Ireland (Munster, Leinster, Meath, and part of Connacht). Ireland also still has Norse-Gaelic towns in addition to forts and early pre-Norman Irish proto-castles (few of those remain, as the Normans, then English built over the top of them, since they were already in good defensive positions). The Irish golden age is coming to an end, but the Irish are still actually among the more advanced peoples in western Europe, namely in astronomy and medicine (for a long period in centuries prior, monks studying medicine in northern Europe almost invariably studied in Ireland, as they had Greek medical texts as well as extensive native medicine and research). The Irish are on alright terms with the Roman and Greek churches (Irish priests even acted as moderators at times in discussions between the Popes and Patriarchs, though both were a bit suspicious of the Irish, which led to the Irish getting involved with the Crusades, specifically in Iberia, to restore the Pope's trust in them, and the formal adoption of the Roman rite). While small, the country actually has a bit of clout at the time. Too many people assume Ireland was this perpetually backwards country, without realizing that doesn't really begin in earnest until about 1250 (a good 75-ish years after the Norman invasion), with major slow downs in development due to incessant warfare, though things were winding down from about 1100 as the country began to feudalize, disrupting quite a bit.

Norse-Gaels had more armor, came from the cities (like Cork, Limerick, Dublin, and Wexford), and employed less cavalry. However, they fought pretty similar to the Gaels, just, with better armor and less horsemen. They were all subjects of Gaelic kings at this point, but did have a slightly unique culture, which was similar to that of the Manx, as well as the Hebrideans, Galwegians, and northernmost Scottish clans.

The native Gaelic sword is a short, broad-bladed sword with no guard, primarily for thrusting. It's more of a long dagger, similar to the Roman gladius. However, these were being phased out among actual warriors with Norse-styled swords, though featuring Gaelic designs (like S- and V-guards). Gaels also used battle axes, cudgels, and many, many spears of various lengths, from very short thrusting spears, to long two-handed pikes, called geadus. Javelins were extremely common, from the small dart (a javelin about a third the length of a normal javelin), to slightly larger javelins, to small throwing spears, up to the very heavy throwing spears and harpoons. Archers were most common with tribes and clans that lived on islands or near the sea (they used them from boats in sea engagements), but existed elsewhere. Munster even had two-thousand longbowmen (imitating Welsh mercenaries) guarding the citadel of Casiel (modern Cashel). However, slings were also still in use, as they are longer range and more accurate than a regular bow (but require more space to use them, since you have to swing your arm out wide, hence why bows were more useful on ships).

Gaelic horsemen ride ponies, not larger horses, as the places they live are mostly uneven, soft, forested, or rocky terrain, and ponies navigate such places far easier than horses. Scots would eventually use large Norman destriers in southern Scotland, but even then, highland cavalry was pony-mounted.

Gaelic armor for most was a leather vest or a padded coat (a cuton or acton) worn over their shirt. Wealthier would have a mail shirt or coat, called Luireach. Shields were mainly small and rectangular or circular (the targe didn't exist yet though), faced with leather, and rarely had designs. Wealthier warriors employed Norman-styled heaters and kite shields though. Helmets were mostly leather caps (though some were very thick with a kind of 'crown', like a leather flat-top helmet), but, again, the wealthy had iron helmets, usually conical without a nose-guard, but some did use nose-guards. Helmets were sometimes rather decorative, with plumes or crests.

And I can't make them, it's something to keep in mind if you get a modeler though. Mind also, two-handed swords didn't exist in large numbers yet, they'd be so rare as to require them to be custom-produced. Two-handed swords in Britain and Ireland later used imported German-made blades affixed to locally produced hilts. 1080 is before that mass production of large blades began, so they had to be made custom by local smiths. Any regular soldier should not possess one. Heroes maybe, or maybe have one as a quest reward. The High King of Ireland should have one, it was his grandfather's (Brian Boru's), which was returned to him as a gift by Diarmait, king of Leinster, when Toirdelbach was just king of Munster. There is a photo of the original from the early 1900s, but it has since been stolen.

Hope any of that helps.

You, my good man, are much too smart for these forums. Please stop making me feel retarted because that is a violation of forum rules.
 

Dimos

Banned
Somairle: I just asked you to comment the mod not repost the infos you send me...

GodsHand: Please calm down, and don't rise the spirits! Did you liked the mod?

To all: I fixed the bug with the sea travel for Island of man to Wales...

Savage: Hope that is true...
 

GodsHand

Veteran
Dimos said:
Somairle: I just asked you to comment the mod not repost the infos you send me...

GodsHand: Please calm down, and don't rise the spirits! Did you liked the mod?

To all: I fixed the bug with the sea travel for Island of man to Wales...

Savage: Hope that is true...

Yeah haha I was just kidding and the mod's great so far
 

Dimos

Banned
GodsHand said:
Dimos said:
Somairle: I just asked you to comment the mod not repost the infos you send me...

GodsHand: Please calm down, and don't rise the spirits! Did you liked the mod?

To all: I fixed the bug with the sea travel for Island of man to Wales...

Savage: Hope that is true...

Yeah haha I was just kidding and the mod's great so far

Thanks for your good comment  :grin: ... Cheers!
 

GodsHand

Veteran
Dimos said:
GodsHand said:
Dimos said:
Somairle: I just asked you to comment the mod not repost the infos you send me...

GodsHand: Please calm down, and don't rise the spirits! Did you liked the mod?

To all: I fixed the bug with the sea travel for Island of man to Wales...

Savage: Hope that is true...

Yeah haha I was just kidding and the mod's great so far

Thanks for your good comment  :grin: ... Cheers!

No problem. So how long have you been working on this mod?
 

Somairle

Knight
Dimos said:
Somairle: I just asked you to comment the mod not repost the infos you send me...

GodsHand: Please calm down, and don't rise the spirits! Did you liked the mod?

To all: I fixed the bug with the sea travel for Island of man to Wales...

Savage: Hope that is true...

Sorry, didn't quite follow what you'd meant. I like the mod, I'd just like to help in some fashion.
 
brittaniaxt9.png




I made this for you, because you didn't have to seem to have a proper sig, so here it is .

 

Dimos

Banned
Light In Extension: I can't accept that brcause it doesn't mention the mod creator/leader ''By Dimos''  :???:


Somairle: Ok, I understand you, never mind... And thanks for the info...


GodsHand: I had the idea for it before 20-25 days. I started that about 10-12 days before the BETA release... I am working now in a more relaxing tempo, but I am working by plan. I don't use the module system. I do the mod  manually (I script with the number codes -that's how I made the new tutorial accesible, ect-) ...

To all: I think of starting scening this week... Can somebody give me some feedback about the mods major towns, and their wall strucrure, their houses and population density... By now I think I will create a ''fort'' in the village of Carlisle (It is mentioned that William Rufus had fortified that village against the scot raids -thought after king William the Conqueror was dead-)

PS: As a claimant to England I have put Duke Robert Curthose (of Normandy), but the dialogue script of him is hardcoded :neutral: as I recall, so he uses Lady Isola's dialogue... Hope I will find a way to fix that...
 

Savage

Banned
What does it matter if the sig doesn't include your name? It looks awesome, you just attach the link to this page and then you will know who is making it and what it is about. And if this will be a really great mod, people will know your name anyways, or... just call you "the mod maker of Brittania mod". But that's close enough.
 

Dimos

Banned
Guys: note down that I have spoken with Kerosima (maker of the Sailing mod) and he told me that he can help me with the sea travel but he will be able to start work after Christmas, on January-February... =2009! ... I'll try to do some work on my own... but as I mentioned I know very little scripting and I waork manually... Withought a module system.

1.010 version is out, so I'll try to import my work there... Hope that will work -of course I'll make the changes needed for the 1.010-

PS: Feel free to ask me about the mod and search for bugs. Also, do you want me to make a thread for the mods screenshots? Thanks for the replies and feedback so far...

With pride, Dimos
 
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