Best-dressed Warrior

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A maille mask strikes me as a really, really bad idea. Maybe your face doesn't get cut in two, but it's not rigid enough to stop an impact like a fencing mask does.

Also I'm definitely with Mr Easton on this one. Too much poking and electrified outfits.
 
To be honest, I much more prefer fencing part of modern pentathlon to sport fencing. Duels there seem to fit much better the idea of not getting stabbed rather than stabbing opponent blink of an eye before being stabbed.
 
Don't worry I was just joking about fencing today, I'm perfectly aware and most people in it too that it isn't for real combat use.
But you know there is different rule between the weapons and he speak of foil, with the épée for exemple there is no priority, and foil is a training weapon since is origin.
 
WaIt, is there a sport that teach you how to use swords? I mean, defending yourself and try hitting the opponnent, but not like the classic fencing.
 
djogloc02 said:
WaIt, is there a sport that teach you how to use swords? I mean, defending yourself and try hitting the opponnent, but not like the classic fencing.

I don't know about the other countries, but here we call it historical fencing/dueling and there are some(very little) schools. The one I know for sure(cannot say a thing about the others) has courses with certain types and styles of Medieval longswords and broadswords and some sabre(or is it saber?) combat. Tomorrow, I could find the link to their site, they will surely have pics and stuff. :smile:
 
Do not look here said:
To be honest, all three (left one, two far right one) look shopped. I mean, compare two dudes to the left, they have same "faces" and angle doesn't make sense. Second from right has same "eyes" like one before him glued to a static chainmail texture and one far right have those mail rings extremely elongated (don't even know if that's the word)

EDIT: come to think about it, it's probably just a way someone came up with to "censor" their faces.
yep. Two on the right have mail shopped over their eyes. Dude with the clappable visor has the helmet of his neighbour shooped on his face.
 
Foeurdr said:
Don't worry I was just joking about fencing today, I'm perfectly aware and most people in it too that it isn't for real combat use.
But you know there is different rule between the weapons and he speak of foil, with the épée for exemple there is no priority, and foil is a training weapon since is origin.

I am most curious as to how any fencing, HEMA longsword included, is useful for any real combat use.
 
It depends if it comes from the original manuals or treatise. The rapier fencing I used to do, years back, was taken directly from the works of Giacomo di Grassi & Ridulfo Capo Ferro. All attacks and defences were made with the intent to land what would be a 'kill' shot - that is with a sharpened blade and without the 'breaking of the wrist'* the attack would kill, cripple or seriously wound the opponent. If I ever have to fight with a sharpened rapier, small sword etc my instinctive knowledge of the movements would give me a significant advantage, notably with regards to footwork and avoiding incoming attacks, which constitutes the majority of swordplay & the primary means of not getting killed. When you go by the original works you're learning from the practical knowledge gained by those who actually fought and killed others and honed what they knew, had been taught and had picked up into a form for others to learn from. Instruction was often their main forms of income so they had to be good fighters, really good, in order to sell their publications and lessons.

I'd say the most important thing you can learn from any martial art is the footwork. I don't care how shoddy a persons bladework can be, if they know how to move around whilst remaining balanced, poised and able to threaten you constantly, they're far more of a threat than someone who has brilliant swordwork but falls over their own feet. Good swordwork often follows on from good footwork.

*When performing an attack, to avoid injury to the opponent, once the point had made contact we'd immediately lift the wrist up to break the power from the strike.
 
Speaking of fencing, there is in France those king musketeers particulary famous after the book of Alexandre Dumas, "The Three Musketeers", though with a lot of fantasizing around them fighting the Cardinal guard, I remenber a book about dueling in the XVIe, XVIIe and XVIIIe century saying that there were violent altercations between them implicating dueling and that there weren't rare. In these three century the use of a duel to settle dispute was pretty common and many times the kings made edict to stop them, the punishment was death for both, there was period where it was more efficient in application and some were nobody really respected it.

Musketeer from the first company (louis XIII)
f1.highres
Musketeer from the second company (louis XIV)
f1.highres

Both picture were made in 1756, and for those who wonder what Gallica is, it's the numerical library of the French National Library (BNF)
 
rapier17 said:
If I ever have to fight with a sharpened rapier, small sword etc my instinctive knowledge of the movements would give me a significant advantage, notably with regards to footwork and avoiding incoming attacks, which constitutes the majority of swordplay & the primary means of not getting killed.
Off-topic brainfart: has the footwork you've developed through your fencing classes improved your dancing skills?
 
Sadly, no. I always have been, and no doubt will always remain, a poor dancer. However I'm pretty nifty when it comes to general movement*.

*As silly as it may sound there can be quite a marked difference in movement between how a (former) martial artist moves about and how someone without martial training moves around. Unless I just exhibit it blatantly with a natural flamboyance, I've had it remarked upon repeatedly over the past 10 years. However a very good friend of mine who has trained in mixed martial arts moves with a grace you normally would not expect from a man of his height (6'2") and build (very broad muscular upper body with a bit of a belly).

On-topic and for the season;
1613887_837493846308576_3030765440472475856_n.jpg
 
Yes, this is the reconstruction I meant. I got immediatly the same thought as Eктωρ when I first looked at it.
Knowing that archeologists like to make mistakes I thought it was vembraces and greaves misleadingly put onto the chest but the piece of mail worn over the shoulders does indeed imply the use of it as chest armor.

 
Yeah, that's got to have some sort of mail under it.

jacobhinds said:
But you'd have to get the blade precisely lined up. I can imagine it's a bit lighter than mail of the same coverage and a ton easier to make.

I don't think so, dude; if you have a piercing sword like a spatha and turn it so it's sitting with the blade vertically, any stab you do is going to slide off the sides of the plate and pierce the cloth. It's already the standard way of holding a sword, in close quarters with a seax it would be very easy to exploit that.
 
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