Author Topic: Is Mythology the turth disguised as a Tale? or a Tale to disguise a Turth?  (Read 460630 times)

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Gr0vZ

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Re: Is Mythology the turth disguised as a Tale? or a Tale to disguise a Turth?
« Reply #3720 on: November 02, 2012, 03:49:06 PM »
Κέφι (kefi) - fun
I dont know what this is

Oh, yes you do. You never had "keyif" in your life? That's kind of sad.

Μπαρούτι (baruti) - blackpowder (note that Greeks came in their greater contact with firearms under the Ottoman rule)
I thought this was Arabic version of the Greek word pyrite or something like that?

Μπουντρούμι (budrumi) - dungeon
I thought this was also related to something Greek

So, you're trying to tell me that the words "barut" and "bodrum" ring no bells to you? Also "σιδηροπυρίτης" (sidiropiritis-pyrite) and "πυρίτιδα" (piritida-gunpowder) have... well, no common points apart from being chemical terms. There is also the word "πυρίτιο" (piritio), but that's the greek word for "silicon".

Βρε (vre) - a form of a calling idiom
This exists only in Balkan dialects of Turkish, I would relate it to one of the Balkan languages. Something related to "brother" perhaps?

Nope, nothing related to "brother", neither in greek, neither in any slavic language of the Balkans, considering that this word is almost universal in all slavic languages. I, as of polish descent, could use the word "brat" and I'm sure a Bulgarian would understand what I mean by that. As I said, "vre" is a calling idiom, like in "sus, vre maskara", which, by the way, if used in Greece, it will make sense to everyone.

Νταλκάς (dalkas) - love sorrow
The only thing I can relate this to in Turkish is dalga, which means wave.

Indeed, I forgot to add "wave", or rather "tide" as one of its interpretations. That's how "love sorrow" binds to it.

Allegro

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Re: Is Mythology the turth disguised as a Tale? or a Tale to disguise a Turth?
« Reply #3721 on: November 02, 2012, 04:59:43 PM »
Oh, yes you do. You never had "keyif" in your life? That's kind of sad.
The similarity just didnt strike me at first.



So, you're trying to tell me that the words "barut" and "bodrum" ring no bells to you? Also "σιδηροπυρίτης" (sidiropiritis-pyrite) and "πυρίτιδα" (piritida-gunpowder) have... well, no common points apart from being chemical terms. There is also the word "πυρίτιο" (piritio), but that's the greek word for "silicon".
Of course I know those words, its just I thought they had Greek or Latin origins. I strongly believe that the word "barut" is the Arabic derivation from something Greek, which is related to fire. Greeks may have re-adopted the Arabicized version of the word, like American companies that have strong business ties with Japan using the term "sarariman" instead of "salaryman".




Gr0vZ

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Re: Is Mythology the turth disguised as a Tale? or a Tale to disguise a Turth?
« Reply #3722 on: November 02, 2012, 06:46:25 PM »
It's hard to say if there is any possibility that the word for black powder in Arabic would derive from some ancient greek word, since Ancient Greeks did not know gunpowder, so it's far more possible that the Arabs named it out of other derivation, taken also the geographical distances.

As for fire, in ancient greek it was known as "πῦρ" (pir) and anything related to it sounded the same like "πύρινος" (pirinos - "fiery" in its male form). In moden greek, the word "φωτιά" (fotia) is used instead, which comes out of the same medieval greek word for glow, radiance, shine, etc. Still, words related to "φωτιά", like "φωτεινός" (fotinos - "radiant" in its male form), have no meaning of fire, but radiance, whereas words related to "πυρ" are used to describe anything igneous.

ancalimon

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Re: Is Mythology the turth disguised as a Tale? or a Tale to disguise a Turth?
« Reply #3723 on: November 03, 2012, 08:37:02 PM »
Here comes one of my favorite Turkic corrupted sentence as an answer for Schemer:

ancestor

http://www.seslisozluk.net/?word=%C3%B6nce
http://www.seslisozluk.net/?word=%C3%B6ncesi

for the last suffi dir~dür (if the sentence is not related with Tur people), see here:
http://www.dnathan.com/language/turkish/tsd/
http://www.iacd.or.kr/pdf/journal/02/2-10.pdf

öncesi tur
or
öncesidir
or
öncüsü tur
or
öncüsüdür
« Last Edit: November 03, 2012, 08:46:05 PM by ancalimon »

Bromden

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Re: Is Mythology the turth disguised as a Tale? or a Tale to disguise a Turth?
« Reply #3724 on: November 03, 2012, 08:45:47 PM »
Büllshıt.

[Middle English auncestre, from Old French, from Latin antecessor, predecessor, from antecessus, past participle of antecēdere, to precede : ante-, ante- + cēdere, to go; see ked- in Indo-European roots.]
Brombem, i see you are stubborn like a goat!!!
Answer the questions bromen.

ancalimon

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Re: Is Mythology the turth disguised as a Tale? or a Tale to disguise a Turth?
« Reply #3725 on: November 03, 2012, 08:50:25 PM »
Büllshıt.

[Middle English auncestre, from Old French, from Latin antecessor, predecessor, from antecessus, past participle of antecēdere, to precede : ante-, ante- + cēdere, to go; see ked- in Indo-European roots.]

Those Proto-Indo Eurpeans were pretty weird people for understanding Turkic sentences as single words.

Think of how an English would feel if they saw a group of others having words like:

whatiwipeemyasswithafterishit :  paper
itshallhurtyoureyes: sunlight
youhavetokeepitcleanbecausewomenlovesuckingit: banana

etc, etc.

Let's assume that I say that I was wrong in all of my previous arguments...  Then the question will still be unanswered: How the hell did this happen? Who made it this way? Did what we call Yahwe from the bible did this? Was Yahwe aliens from another planet or dimension? Was it God?  This is like a science fiction movie that is actually real.
« Last Edit: November 03, 2012, 08:56:25 PM by ancalimon »

NikeBG

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Re: Is Mythology the turth disguised as a Tale? or a Tale to disguise a Turth?
« Reply #3726 on: November 03, 2012, 09:13:11 PM »
I, as of polish descent, could use the word "brat" and I'm sure a Bulgarian would understand what I mean by that.
Indeed I would. We use the exact same form and I think most Slavs actually do so (at least, I don't see much room for "diversifying" the word). As well as, of course, the other, similar, though possibly unrelated root-word "bat" (batko/bate/bati depending on the context), which we use for "big brother" (similarly - "kaka" for "big sister"). I've heard that "bat" isn't exactly Slavic though, but rather Iranic (or, in the case of this thread - Turkic). So I wonder if other Slavic languages use it or not..?

Let's assume that I say that I was wrong in all of my previous arguments...  Then the question will still be unanswered: How the hell did this happen? Who made it this way? Did what we call Yahwe from the bible did this? Was Yahwe aliens from another planet or dimension? Was it God?  This is like a science fiction movie that is actually real.
The monkeys made them do it!
All these are just words. They don't show anything.

Bromden

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Re: Is Mythology the turth disguised as a Tale? or a Tale to disguise a Turth?
« Reply #3727 on: November 03, 2012, 09:15:17 PM »
Let's assume that I say that I was wrong in all of my previous arguments...  Then the question will still be unanswered: How the hell did this happen? Who made it this way? Did what we call Yahwe from the bible did this? Was Yahwe aliens from another planet or dimension? Was it God?  This is like a science fiction movie that is actually real.
I've got bad news, dude. It all originates from inside your skull.
Brombem, i see you are stubborn like a goat!!!
Answer the questions bromen.

ancalimon

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Re: Is Mythology the turth disguised as a Tale? or a Tale to disguise a Turth?
« Reply #3728 on: November 03, 2012, 09:27:20 PM »
Let's assume that I say that I was wrong in all of my previous arguments...  Then the question will still be unanswered: How the hell did this happen? Who made it this way? Did what we call Yahwe from the bible did this? Was Yahwe aliens from another planet or dimension? Was it God?  This is like a science fiction movie that is actually real.
I've got bad news, dude. It all originates from inside your skull.


I can not create riddles like these. I dont have the ability.

NikeBG

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Re: Is Mythology the turth disguised as a Tale? or a Tale to disguise a Turth?
« Reply #3729 on: November 03, 2012, 09:31:49 PM »
You underestimate yourself, mate! :)

I think you should even publish a book. That way, other people like you would have another source to quote to prove themselves right. ;)
All these are just words. They don't show anything.

Bromden

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Re: Is Mythology the turth disguised as a Tale? or a Tale to disguise a Turth?
« Reply #3730 on: November 03, 2012, 09:33:08 PM »
Don't underestimate yourself. You've been throwing intricate fantasies at us since I know your work.

Oh, the ninja.
Brombem, i see you are stubborn like a goat!!!
Answer the questions bromen.

Gr0vZ

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Re: Is Mythology the turth disguised as a Tale? or a Tale to disguise a Turth?
« Reply #3731 on: November 04, 2012, 06:33:40 PM »
Wow, ancalimon got muted?  :shock:

What now?

Rule zum Rabensang

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Re: Is Mythology the turth disguised as a Tale? or a Tale to disguise a Turth?
« Reply #3732 on: November 04, 2012, 08:04:16 PM »
What now?
The world is a darker place now. But who knows, maybe illumination is at hand...

Amman de Stazia

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Re: Is Mythology the turth disguised as a Tale? or a Tale to disguise a Turth?
« Reply #3733 on: November 04, 2012, 11:36:41 PM »

For example in this word, "ekle" meaning glue,join together in Turkish can be seen in the form "glue" in IE languages.

aha! read on!

The Turkish word-group around 'ekle' is actually DESCENDED from the pre-celtic languages of the British Isles.
Long study has shown that some words filtered through into late-modern Scots, one of which is 'ickle'.  This now means small, but the meaning drifted considerably since pre-celtic usage, via the celts in the first  millenium BC, some Scandinavian influences, and eventually the confrontation with English after the 13th century.
The original meaning quite certainly expresses the concept "put small pieces together".

So you see how although your Turckk sounds may have been spreading around for the last few hundred years, they themselves were adopted from other sources, including the British Isles.

How can this be?   You ask yourself - the ancient culture of the upper Euphrates could not possibly have been influenced by some island hermits, huddling in their skins and gnawing on bones....

Well, no.  But the pre-celtic cultures of the British Isles have been acknowledged as some of the most advanced of the Bronze Age and have demonstrated trade links with the mediterannean as well as most of the North-Sea and even Baltic coastal cultures.   So do not despair, dear ancalimon, the turkk were not subjugated by some wild neanderthals, but educated by a higher society that came to trade, teach and share.
[/size]
http://forums.taleworlds.net/index.php/topic,12250.msg208344.html#msg208344

Family IS more important than Mount and Blade. 

Family D'Stazia.  (A, K and S )

PS - this line plugs TPW - The Peninsular War mod.http://forums.taleworlds.net/index.php/topic,42454.0.html

darthdj31

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Re: Is Mythology the turth disguised as a Tale? or a Tale to disguise a Turth?
« Reply #3734 on: November 05, 2012, 05:25:19 AM »

For example in this word, "ekle" meaning glue,join together in Turkish can be seen in the form "glue" in IE languages.

aha! read on!

The Turkish word-group around 'ekle' is actually DESCENDED from the pre-celtic languages of the British Isles.
Long study has shown that some words filtered through into late-modern Scots, one of which is 'ickle'.  This now means small, but the meaning drifted considerably since pre-celtic usage, via the celts in the first  millenium BC, some Scandinavian influences, and eventually the confrontation with English after the 13th century.
The original meaning quite certainly expresses the concept "put small pieces together".

So you see how although your Turckk sounds may have been spreading around for the last few hundred years, they themselves were adopted from other sources, including the British Isles.

How can this be?   You ask yourself - the ancient culture of the upper Euphrates could not possibly have been influenced by some island hermits, huddling in their skins and gnawing on bones....

Well, no.  But the pre-celtic cultures of the British Isles have been acknowledged as some of the most advanced of the Bronze Age and have demonstrated trade links with the mediterannean as well as most of the North-Sea and even Baltic coastal cultures.   So do not despair, dear ancalimon, the turkk were not subjugated by some wild neanderthals, but educated by a higher society that came to trade, teach and share.
[/size]
That's a while back though, before Hammurabi possibly?
Hi there. I guess.